Ravens jersey – Partner Pharmacy 24-7 http://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:49:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-70-120x120.png Ravens jersey – Partner Pharmacy 24-7 http://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/ 32 32 Implementing services into the community pharmacy workflow presents challenges https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/implementing-services-into-the-community-pharmacy-workflow-presents-challenges/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:49:12 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/implementing-services-into-the-community-pharmacy-workflow-presents-challenges/ Areas for improvement include the business model, healthcare team buy-in, patient engagement, and technology. The Medicare Prescribing, Drugs, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 established requirements under Part D to provide medication therapy management (MTM) services to eligible Medicare beneficiaries.1 This paved the way for an expanded role for pharmacists in patient care. In 2018, […]]]>

Areas for improvement include the business model, healthcare team buy-in, patient engagement, and technology.

The Medicare Prescribing, Drugs, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 established requirements under Part D to provide medication therapy management (MTM) services to eligible Medicare beneficiaries.1

This paved the way for an expanded role for pharmacists in patient care. In 2018, approximately 65% ​​of plans reported using community pharmacists through supplier contracts.2.3 However, challenges exist with implementing MTM services into the community pharmacy workflow.

Overcome the obstacles

Results of a cross-sectional study from a random sample of Medicare beneficiary enrollment data evaluating the 2014 Part D MTM files showed that community pharmacists provided more medication treatment problem recommendations (MTP ) (P < .001) but resolved fewer MTPs than those provided by non-community pharmacists (e.g., in-house pharmacists of MTM providers, Medicare Part D plan pharmacists)2. Evidence shows that the following challenges are associated with implementing TMD services in community practice: barriers to the business model, integration of programs within the health care team, integration into the pharmacy workflow, lack of patient engagement, and difficulties in adapting technology (Figure2-5).

Challenges in integrating MTM services into the pharmacy workflow include difficulty in training staff, insufficient dedicated physical space to perform consultations, and lack of time.2.3 Busy pharmacy chains may have difficulty integrating MTM services due to the many responsibilities of pharmacists, including administering vaccines and dispensing medications. Evidence shows that access to technology is essential for MTM services, especially for reviewing electronic medical records.3.4 Typically, MTM providers use web-based software for documentation and billing, so onboarding qualified pharmacy technicians for this task is essential. Findings from another study identified barriers and implementation strategies for integrating a web-based medication management application into community pharmacies.4 Additionally, study results showed that clinical training, computer literacy, and leadership training facilitated the implementation of an online program into practice.4 However, staff opposition to change and providers’ reluctance to share data were seen as barriers to implementing the technology.4

Lack of patient interest in MTM services is also a barrier.3 Additionally, many patients are unaware that clinical training for pharmacists goes beyond dispensing medications.3 Pharmacists can develop a standardized approach to providing MTM services and explain their roles to patients. Pharmacists and physicians can also work together successfully through collaborative medication therapy management to improve communication and patient care services.3 Results from a third study showed that there was an increase in MTM completion rates after the implementation of an educational intervention in community pharmacies (P < 0.001).5

According to the results of a Health2 Resources report, more than 600 practicing pharmacists and program managers who responded to the survey believed that comprehensive medication management (CMM) services enable healthcare organizations to achieve patient satisfaction. clinicians, cost savings, better outcomes and patient satisfaction. .6

The CMM approach focuses on clinical, patient and personal goals to improve health outcomes.6 Goodrich Pharmacy, an independent pharmacy in Anoka, Minnesota, and HealthPartners successfully completed the CMM.6 HealthPartners began paying for CMM services in 2006.6 At press time, Goodrich Pharmacy employed 18 pharmacists at 7 sites and they used CMM with approximately 900 patients.6

About the Author

Jennifer Gershman, PharmD, CPh, PACSis a drug information pharmacist and Pharmacy Times® contributor who lives in South Florida.

References

1. Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003, HR 1, 108th Cong (2003). Accessed April 7, 2022. https://www.congress.gov/bill/108th-congress/house-bill/1

2. Adeoye OA, Farley JF, Coe AB, et al. Provision of medication therapy management by community pharmacists: insight from a national sample of Medicare Part D beneficiaries. J Am Coll Clin Pharm. 2019;2(4):373-382. doi:10.1002/jac5.1160

3. Ferreri SP, Hughes TD, Snyder ME. Management of drug therapy: current challenges. Integr Pharm Res Practice. 2020;9:71-81. doi:10.2147/IPRP.S179628

4. Turner K, Renfro C, Ferreri S, Roberts K, Pfeiffenberger T, Shea CM. Support community pharmacies with the implementation of a web-based medication management application. Appl Clin Inform. 2018;9(2):391-402. doi:10.1055/s-0038-1651488

5. Hohmeier KC, Wheeler JS, Brookhart A, et al. Targeting adaptability to improve implementation of medication therapy management (MTM) in community pharmacy. Implement Sci. 2019;14(1):99. doi:10.1186/s13012-019-0946-7

6. GTMRx Institute. The Get the Medications iight report: a national overview of expert practices – Comprehensive medication management in outpatient/community pharmacies. May 2016. Accessed April 8, 2022. https://gtmr.org/the-gtmr-report/

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Achievements of community pharmacy owner Mollie Spencer honored with 40 Under 40 distinction – The Oxford Eagle https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/achievements-of-community-pharmacy-owner-mollie-spencer-honored-with-40-under-40-distinction-the-oxford-eagle/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:37:51 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/achievements-of-community-pharmacy-owner-mollie-spencer-honored-with-40-under-40-distinction-the-oxford-eagle/ Mollie Spencer, an alumnus of the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, has been tested many times in her life. Whether it’s taking a personality test to find the best career or being challenged as a business owner, Spencer finds the rewards in hard work, as she was recently named in the class. inaugural 40 […]]]>

Mollie Spencer, an alumnus of the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, has been tested many times in her life.

Whether it’s taking a personality test to find the best career or being challenged as a business owner, Spencer finds the rewards in hard work, as she was recently named in the class. inaugural 40 Under 40 of the Ole Miss Alumni Association.

“I am very honored to have been chosen for this award,” Community Pharmacy owner and pharmacist Spencer told Senatobia. “The last few years have been full of changes with the purchase of a pharmacy, the renovation of a historic building to move my pharmacy there, as well as the addition of a gift shop, a soda store and from a loft to the pharmacy.

“I received several awards for all these achievements, but this award was accepted with the greatest pride. Not vain pride, but the one I’m most proud of. I’m proud to be recognized alongside my peers at Ole Miss.

The 40 Under 40 honor recognizes young college graduates who have had significant personal, professional and philanthropic achievements. Spencer, who earned her doctorate in pharmacy in 2011, joins fellow pharmacist Lauren Lyles-Stolz on the list.

“We are so proud of everything Mollie has accomplished and done for her community,” said Donna Strum, Dean of the School of Pharmacy. “Renovating a building and owning your own business is not an easy task, but Mollie has done it so successfully.

“It’s great to see strong female leadership and entrepreneurship in our profession.”

One of Spencer’s first tests may have been transitioning from her dream of being a professional entertainer. It was her mother, as a person who worked in the medical field, who guided her to see which professions best suited her personality.

“I vividly remember we talked about how there were so many different paths with pharmacy that you can take, how you can work as little or as much as you want with the profession, how it’s a great work for working moms, it all convinced me that this would be a great choice,” Spencer said. “I also had my heart set on going to Ole Miss right out of high school.

“Agreeing to major in pharmacy was key to getting me to Oxford as soon as possible.”

Spencer’s career began at a large retail store before finding a position at the Pavilion Pharmacy at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Although based in the hospital, it was a retail establishment that helped Spencer learn the day-to-day operations essential to running her own pharmacy.

The opportunity to buy an independent pharmacy came soon after, and Spencer never looked back.

“It gave me the opportunity to come home and serve the people I’ve known all my life,” Spencer said. “So in terms of my career path, it wasn’t really planned per se, but rather transformed as my personal life and my priorities changed.”

The tests and challenges didn’t stop for Spencer, but turned into lessons along the way. Along with learning the business side of running a store, Spencer said realizing you can’t please everyone and saying no were some of the toughest things to overcome.

However, being able to call on former supervisors, his cousin and pharmacist Nelson Burford, and mentors, such as independent owners Cheryl Sudduth, of Funderburk’s Pharmacy in Hernando, and Bob Lomenick, of Tyson Drugs and Right Way Meds in Holly Springs, G&M Pharmacy in Oxford and Potts Camp Pharmacy in Potts Camp, to answer any questions Spencer found success in his store.

What lessons would Spencer impart to student pharmacists? Not sweating the small stuff and branching out with different rotations and options are a big part of his advice.

“Obviously study hard, but the relationships you make along the way and the experiences you gain are far more important down the road than the grade you got on a test,” Spencer said.

“And never say never to own your own pharmacy!”

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RPS partners with the Marie Curie association for community pharmacy https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/rps-partners-with-the-marie-curie-association-for-community-pharmacy/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 16:55:40 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/rps-partners-with-the-marie-curie-association-for-community-pharmacy/ The Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) has launched a partnership with the charity Marie Curie to develop professional standards in end-of-life care for the community pharmacy. Available to pharmacy teams across the UK, the standards will provide a free, evidence-based framework to help community pharmacies self-assess and continuously improve their end-of-life and bereavement care for patients […]]]>

The Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) has launched a partnership with the charity Marie Curie to develop professional standards in end-of-life care for the community pharmacy.

Available to pharmacy teams across the UK, the standards will provide a free, evidence-based framework to help community pharmacies self-assess and continuously improve their end-of-life and bereavement care for patients and caregivers.

They will enable community pharmacy teams to work together to develop their own practice.

RPS is establishing a Professional Standards Steering Group that will include experts in community pharmacy, experts in palliative and end-of-life care, lay members, and healthcare professionals who interact with community pharmacy.

Elen Jones, Senior Director of Palliative Care at RPS, said: “RPS has a long-term commitment, striving to ensure that people living with life-limiting conditions who are nearing the end of life have prompt access to medication and clinical support from a team of qualified pharmacy.

“Developing these standards, in partnership with Marie Curie, is a critical step in helping community pharmacy teams take simple quality improvement steps and build on the care they already provide to this group of patients and caregivers.

Dr Sarah Holmes, Medical Director of Marie Curie UK and palliative care consultant, said: “The new Daffodil Standards will play a key role in delivering excellent end-of-life care and ensuring that community pharmacists busy and the pharmacy team have the support they need to continuously develop and improve the quality of care they provide to people at the end of life and their loved ones.

“We are delighted with this collaboration with the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and to support the implementation of these standards in UK pharmacies once produced.

If you would like to share your stories and/or experiences with us, please email [email protected]

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A thank you to community pharmacy and those who have inspired us to join the profession https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/a-thank-you-to-community-pharmacy-and-those-who-have-inspired-us-to-join-the-profession/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/a-thank-you-to-community-pharmacy-and-those-who-have-inspired-us-to-join-the-profession/ As I attended a Health Education England session on ‘promoting pharmacy as a career of choice’ at this year’s conference Clinical Pharmacy Congressan audience member reflected on his reason for joining the profession. Community pharmacy work experience at age 14 was a big factor in her decision to become a pharmacist, she said, and judging […]]]>

As I attended a Health Education England session on ‘promoting pharmacy as a career of choice’ at this year’s conference Clinical Pharmacy Congressan audience member reflected on his reason for joining the profession.

Community pharmacy work experience at age 14 was a big factor in her decision to become a pharmacist, she said, and judging by the reaction I got to my next tweetthis has been the case for so many pharmacy professionals today.

Here, four pharmacists share their fond memories of their early days in community pharmacy and thank those who inspired them early on.

“I realized how important community pharmacy is to the people it serves”

Clare Howard, Clinical Lead for Drug Optimization at the Wessex Academic Health Science Network (AHSN)

“I want to thank Pharmacy England in Wigan for opening the door to the world of pharmacy for me. I started there in 1988 as a Saturday girl. I had been a waitress (a job I hated) so it was nice to start working in a busy, friendly, family-run community pharmacy in Gidlow, Wigan. I’m so grateful to Mr. England for letting the clumsy, clueless girl I was let loose on Gidlow’s clients and patients.

“All human life was there. I learned so much in this job. First, I have never laughed so much. The “girls” who worked in the shop and the dispensary were all so nice to me and the jokes were priceless. But I also saw real difficulties: people with serious addiction problems; seniors struggling with their mobility; as well as the usual bread and butter of community pharmacies from pregnancy tests, childhood illnesses, long-term conditions and people seeking advice and reassurance from a professional on their main street.

“These formative years have shaped my career. You can’t work in a pharmacy like the one in England without seeing how important community pharmacy is to the people it serves. I saw the GPs and the nurses from the practice across the street as part of the team I was on – we need to keep that model of care close to home.

“I never imagined then that this part-time job would open up a career that has brought me so much. I’ve worked in all kinds of positions in pharmacy, but I’ve never forgotten what I learned at the start. Thank you Mr and Mrs England, I am eternally indebted to you.

“I spent years as a Saturday girl and watched pre-registrations come and go. I was inspired”

Neelm Saini, chief pharmacist at Cookham Pharmacy in Berkshire

“I started my community pharmacy career at the age of 16, working ‘cash’n’wrap’ at Boots in Redhill for four hours every Saturday. This continued as I completed my GCSEs, A-Levels and Diploma, and moved from working at the checkout to other store duties, but most importantly to me I was trained to work behind the pharmacy counter.

“The branch manager at the time was Mr Burridge and he was a fine example of a gentleman and a pharmacist. Nothing phased him and I only remember his smile, always being present in the workshop – the true face of the pharmacy. Margaret and Jenny were two other pharmacists who worked at the branch. Jenny (bless her) had a hard time getting me to the clinic on a day when it was understaffed.

“When I first started out, I remember placing an order for 100 plastipak syringes – except I didn’t appreciate that they came in 100s and so the next morning I was greeted by a wall of 100 boxes . Let’s just say I wasn’t popular that day! Pre-registrations came and went and I was inspired. Sarah was the one I will always remember. Her last day was a very hectic Saturday… I don’t think what she experienced that day is even listed in the official skills! But she succeeded.

“Denise Ede took me through my pre-registration at Boots in Horley. She was fantastic! I had THE best year of pre-registration with a brilliant tutor. Her advice on day one has always stuck with me: ‘Get started the day with a clear and organized bench. “

“I loved the richness of humanity and the access this community pharmacy provided”

Ade Williams, Chief Prescribing Pharmacist at Bedminster Pharmacy in South Bristol and Director and Superintendent Pharmacist of MJ Williams Pharmacy Group

Traherne Pharmacy in Hove was opposite us when I arrived to live in Hove with my aunt. I walked past it every day on my way to college and my aunt, a nurse, advised me to talk to the pharmacist about her career.

“He completely sold it to me. It was the wealth of humanity and the access I loved. A local NHS stronghold, always with a friendly, welcoming vibe.

“An interaction I had during my first qualification made me realize that without patient trust, we pharmacists are powerless”

Bruce Warner, deputy pharmaceutical director of NHS England

“Once I graduated from Sunderland [university], I followed my heart to the northwest where my current wife was also doing her pre-register year – being raised in the home counties it was certainly very different. I pre-registered with Boots in Wigan (what a great place!) then went on the obligatory ‘milk tour’ with Boots all over Merseyside.

“I remember that very soon after graduating, I was working at the St. Helena branch when an elderly man came to the dispensary counter and asked to speak to the pharmacist. The distributor said “definitely” and picked me up. As I was walking out, the patient looked at me and said, “He won’t know anything,” and he just walked away. I was crushed, a newly graduated pharmacist lacking in confidence and trying to establish himself in the workplace and in the profession.

“I thought long and hard about this and in hindsight decided the patient was probably right – a few weeks into qualifying I didn’t know anything. I want to thank this patient for making me realize that there is absolutely no substitute for experience and getting the job done. That sixth sense that only develops over time something goes wrong – there are no shortcuts, no matter how trained you are.

“I have never forgotten the look on that patient’s face or how I felt that morning and I would like to think that I have become a much better pharmacist as a result of this experience. I owe this patient a debt of gratitude for putting me on the right foot and helping me realize that without the patient’s trust, we pharmacists are powerless.

If you would like to pay tribute to community pharmacy or thank someone who has helped you on your career path, post your thanks in the C+D community.

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More Comprehensive ‘Blueprint’ Supports Community Pharmacy – Latest Pharmacy News | Business | Magazine https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/more-comprehensive-blueprint-supports-community-pharmacy-latest-pharmacy-news-business-magazine/ Mon, 30 May 2022 09:34:26 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/more-comprehensive-blueprint-supports-community-pharmacy-latest-pharmacy-news-business-magazine/ NHS England and NHS Improvement released the findings of the Fuller ‘checkup’ on May 26 – setting out how primary care can work with partners in health and care to better meet the needs of their local communities. Dr Claire Fuller report emphasizes the essential role of primary care and the potential of integrated neighborhood […]]]>

NHS England and NHS Improvement released the findings of the Fuller ‘checkup’ on May 26 – setting out how primary care can work with partners in health and care to better meet the needs of their local communities.

Dr Claire Fuller report emphasizes the essential role of primary care and the potential of integrated neighborhood teams to reduce the burden of ill health and address health inequities.

He commends the community pharmacy for keeping “its doors open to the public throughout” the pandemic while being “one of the most recognizable of a host of dedicated staff providing round-the-clock care in all parts of the country”. The report highlights “recruitment and retention challenges across the primary care workforce,” including community pharmacy.

Highlighting the importance of community pharmacy teams in emergency care and prevention, including early diagnosis of cancers, the report points out that pharmacists could play “a more active role in referring eligible people to screening and supporting early diagnosis, building on a number of successful pilots such as those in the Accelerate, Coordinate, Evaluate (ACE) program”.

“Master Plan for Working in Partnership”

The report also includes a vote of thanks to distinguished pharmacist Reena Barai who served on two of the Fuller task forces.

At a report launch event on May 26, Barai said, “As a community pharmacist, I am part of the ‘primary care team’, which is more important than just general medicine. This report will model working in partnership as a “must” rather than a “nice to do”. Over the past two years, I’ve seen a growing desire for collaborative work, driven by the pandemic, but there’s still a long way to go. »

She also cited the NHS Community Pharmacists Consultation Service and the Hypertension Case-Finding Service as examples of services requiring close collaboration focused on patient needs.

Breaking down silos in primary care

The National Pharmacy Association described the document as a “clear signal” that integrated systems of care (ICS) must break down silos in primary care: “At the heart of the new vision for primary care integration is bringing together previously compartmentalized teams and professionals to do things differently to improve the care of entire populations”.

CNSs are encouraged to develop a “single, system-wide approach to managing integrated emergency care to ensure patients receive same-day care.” They are also asked to develop a system-level primary care forum or network, with a wide range of views, including professional representation. According to the NPA, this represents an important opportunity for pharmacies to engage with the NHS at local level.

NPA Chief Executive Mark Lyonette said, “The NPA is pleased to have worked with the Fuller team to ensure the voice of community pharmacy was heard in this review. So often in the past, community pharmacy has barely been recognized in key journals.

“This document is a clear signal to CNSs to break down silos in primary care and engage community pharmacy in a multidisciplinary push on prevention, emergency care, and long-term conditions. It is an invitation to be active partners in integrated care and that means investing time and energy in building relationships to improve local services.

RPS England chairman Thorrun Govind called the report an “important step” on the road to mainstreaming primary care.

She said: “To maximize the contribution of pharmacy teams, we will need to foster pharmacy leadership at the system, location and neighborhood level to ensure their involvement in decision-making.”

Partnership Philosophy

Stating that a ‘partnership philosophy was at the heart of my report’, Dr Fuller highlighted the role of the 42 SCIs who ‘arrive at just the right time, tasked with achieving four goals: improving the health outcomes of the population and health care; tackle inequities in outcomes, experience and access; improve productivity and value for money; and help the NHS support wider social and economic development.

“To get there, we are going to have to look beyond a traditional definition of primary care and understand that NHS emergency care is what patients first access in their community – usually from their home or street. principal and without the need for a referral from a general practitioner.

“This can be online advice on symptoms and self-care, going to a community pharmacy, a general practice appointment, an emergency treatment center or the 111 clinical assessment service out of hours. opening.

“Under access to emergency care, a patient can then be immediately referred to emergency care or go online or speak to someone before going to a hospital’s emergency department.”

If you would like to share your stories and/or experiences with us, please email [email protected]

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Pharmacogenomic screening: come to a community pharmacy near you https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/pharmacogenomic-screening-come-to-a-community-pharmacy-near-you/ Thu, 26 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/pharmacogenomic-screening-come-to-a-community-pharmacy-near-you/ What if you could go to your local pharmacy and get tested to find out how your genes affect how you metabolize drugs, like statins or antidepressants? In several countries, you can. In this episode of The PJ Pod, editor Dawn Connelly travels the world and speaks with community pharmacists who already provide it regularly. […]]]>

What if you could go to your local pharmacy and get tested to find out how your genes affect how you metabolize drugs, like statins or antidepressants? In several countries, you can.

In this episode of The PJ Pod, editor Dawn Connelly travels the world and speaks with community pharmacists who already provide it regularly. She begins by visiting the Netherlands, where she talks to Fleur van Gelder and Jesse Swen about their pharmacogenomic testing service, and experiences it for herself.

She then speaks with community pharmacists Fabio from Rango, Canada, and Nami Nagar, Australia, about the tests they offer and how they have improved their relationships with patients and GPs.

Finally, Connelly returns to the UK to assess when community pharmacies here could provide such a service. She speaks to Munir Pirmohamed, NHS chair in pharmacogenetics, who advises the health service, and delivers exclusive news on a UK pharmacy chain.

This episode was produced by Geoff Marsh.

Want to know more about The PJ Pod? follow youis on Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple podcast or other popular podcast platforms to listen to our latest episodes.

Learn more

Munir Pirmohamed will speak on the implementation of pharmacogenomic testing in the NHS at the RPS Science and Research Summit on Friday June 24, 2022. Learn more here.

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England’s new Chief Pharmaceutical Officer praises work of community pharmacy https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/englands-new-chief-pharmaceutical-officer-praises-work-of-community-pharmacy/ Wed, 25 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/englands-new-chief-pharmaceutical-officer-praises-work-of-community-pharmacy/ The newly appointed Chief Pharmaceutical Officer (CPhO) for England, David Webb, gave an opening speech in person at the LPC and PSNC National Meeting on Thursday 17th May 2022. As the new Chief Pharmaceutical Professions , he defined his personal priorities. for the next years. At the start of his speech, David thanked the community […]]]>

The newly appointed Chief Pharmaceutical Officer (CPhO) for England, David Webb, gave an opening speech in person at the LPC and PSNC National Meeting on Thursday 17th May 2022. As the new Chief Pharmaceutical Professions , he defined his personal priorities. for the next years.

At the start of his speech, David thanked the community pharmacy teams for their work throughout the pandemic to support their local communities and spoke of the many achievements so far. He said he intended to be the CPhO “for all members of both pharmacy professions, in all parts of the NHS”.

“Community pharmacy colleagues have made it clear that you are part of the NHS team and delivered as a sector, and that has further boosted your credibility in terms of how we continue to integrate pharmacy into the NHS and care pathways,” the CPhO said. .

David then gave an overview of Integrated Care Systems (ICS) and described the support that will be available for community pharmacy in an ICS. He also gave some details about

the role and responsibilities of the new SCI Community Pharmacy Clinical Leads, whose role will be to:

  • Support the integration of community pharmacy clinical services into CNSs as part of recognized NHS pathways;
  • help community pharmacies collaborate effectively with primary care networks (RCPs); and
  • drive mobilization within local systems to support scale-up and integration of new clinical services that are being developed through Pharmacy Opportunities Fund (PhIF) pilot projects and then into commissioned services by the contractual framework of the community pharmacy (CPCF).

“The next few years are crucial for the profession and we need to ensure that the right close working relationships are in place at national, system and local level if we are to achieve all of our ambitions,” he said. he declares.

David’s speech was well received by DFC who attended the meeting who said it was great to hear directly from CPhO about their positive plans for the future of the sector.

James Wood, PSNC’s Director of LPC Contractor and Support also commented:

“It is clear that David appreciates the phenomenal efforts of community pharmacy teams throughout the pandemic and the value of community pharmacy to the health of the nation. PSNC looks forward to working with David on shared ambitions in the months and years to come to ensure that our shared vision for the industry becomes a reality.

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DH “monitors” the impact of the recruitment of PCN pharmacists on community pharmacy https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/dh-monitors-the-impact-of-the-recruitment-of-pcn-pharmacists-on-community-pharmacy/ Mon, 23 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/dh-monitors-the-impact-of-the-recruitment-of-pcn-pharmacists-on-community-pharmacy/ More than 18,200 people worked for NCPs in March this year, the DH revealed last week (19 May) – meaning the government is on track to meet its targets. recruitment target 26,000 more primary care staff by March 2024. Staff employed by GP practices include “clinical pharmacists…[who] are fully qualified to treat a range of […]]]>

More than 18,200 people worked for NCPs in March this year, the DH revealed last week (19 May) – meaning the government is on track to meet its targets. recruitment target 26,000 more primary care staff by March 2024.

Staff employed by GP practices include “clinical pharmacists…[who] are fully qualified to treat a range of minor illnesses, providing advice and treatment,” the DH said.

Some community pharmacy employers claimed that there was a shortage of pharmacists in the sector, largely because they had lost them to “NCP-related activities”.

However, the DH pointed out that the number of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians on the register of the General Council of Pharmacy (GPhC) “has increased every year”.

Nevertheless, the DH “continues to monitor the recruitment of new employees” in the NCPs, a spokesperson told C+D last week (20 May).

Work with the sector

The DH also continues to assess the “impact” of this “on community pharmacy by working closely with the sector,” they said.

But ultimately, DH believes that community pharmacy employers are responsible for recruiting and retaining their staff.

Under the five-year Community Pharmacy contract framework, the DH “has committed over £2.5 billion a year to support community pharmacies and ensure they continue to deliver high quality care to patients. “, added the spokesperson.

Read more: Underappreciated and lonely: the other side of the role of the PCN pharmacist

Context of workforce challenges

Pharmacists have been added to the list of government shortage occupations in March of last year.

However, according to Health Education England’s Community Pharmacy Workforce Survey published earlier this year, the number of pharmacists working in community pharmacies increased by 4,122 between 2017 and 2021.

The GPhC register also shows that, over the same period, the number of registered pharmacists increased by 6,848.

Read more: Why did the Ministry of the Interior add pharmacists to the list of shortage professions?

Earlier this month, England’s chief pharmaceutical officer, David Webb, told delegates at the Clinical Pharmacy Congress in London that NHS England and NHS Improvement were “doing everything we can nationally to mitigate » pressures on the pharmaceutical workforce.

Catch up with the great C+D debate, which asked: Is there a shortage of community pharmacists?

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Somerset’s minor injury units will not be replaced by GP community pharmacy units, health bosses promise https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/somersets-minor-injury-units-will-not-be-replaced-by-gp-community-pharmacy-units-health-bosses-promise/ Thu, 19 May 2022 12:30:57 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/somersets-minor-injury-units-will-not-be-replaced-by-gp-community-pharmacy-units-health-bosses-promise/ Somerset’s Minor Injury Units (MIUs) will not be replaced by the new GP Community Pharmacy Service, health bosses have promised. Somerset has seven MIUs, operated by the Somerset NHS Foundation Trust, which provide a range of urgent treatment for patients who cannot get GP appointments and in doing so relieve pressure on the county’s A&E […]]]>

Somerset’s Minor Injury Units (MIUs) will not be replaced by the new GP Community Pharmacy Service, health bosses have promised.

Somerset has seven MIUs, operated by the Somerset NHS Foundation Trust, which provide a range of urgent treatment for patients who cannot get GP appointments and in doing so relieve pressure on the county’s A&E services . The Somerset Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) recently launched the Somerset GP Community Pharmacy Consultation Service (also known as Think Pharmacy), which is designed to quickly treat over 40 minor ailments and injuries.

Health bosses have now sought to assure the public that this new service will not result in any of the MIUs in Somerset being closed or replaced. Somerset’s seven MIUs are located in Bridgwater, Burnham-on-Sea, Chard, Frome, Glastonbury, Minehead and Shepton Mallet, with each facility open between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m.

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Minehead MIU used to offer overnight services, but these were temporarily closed in the summer of 2021 and then permanently closed in March 2022. The new pharmacy service is designed to give patients access to a community pharmacist who can diagnose and treat minor ailments, freeing up around 1,000 GP appointments every month in Somerset for people with more serious conditions.

Patients who call their doctor’s office will be referred to the service, with a same-day appointment being offered in person or over the phone. Minor illnesses or injuries that the service can treat include:

  • Eye and ear infections
  • Sore throat
  • Skin infections
  • Sprains
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Common summer conditions such as hay fever, insect bites and rashes
  • Sprains and pain in the ankle, foot, knee, leg or arm
  • Coughs and colds
  • Headache
  • Mouth ulcers and blisters


Chard Community Hospital near Crewkerne Road in Chard. CREDIT: Daniel Mumby

If the pharmacist feels the patient needs further specialist help, they will be referred to their GP or another health service. Dr Jeremy Imms, Associate Clinical Director at CCG, said: “This service will be of great benefit to many of our patients, as many minor ailments are more appropriate for consultation with a community pharmacist rather than a doctor. generalist.

“This will improve access for patients with minor illnesses and will also help us free up GP appointments for people with more complex healthcare needs; helping to ensure everyone is treated at the right time. , by the right healthcare professional.At this time of year, people begin to experience seasonal conditions, such as hay fever, insect bites and rashes, as well as sports and other injuries. minor injuries just because they’re on the outside more.

“Our community pharmacists are highly experienced in diagnosing and treating common complaints, and patients will now have the option to choose to have their consultation with a pharmacy near them at a time that is convenient for them.” Michael Lennox, CEO of Community Pharmacy Somerset, added: “Community pharmacists are highly trained healthcare professionals with five years’ training and spend a high percentage of their time helping treat patients with minor illnesses and recommend over-the-counter treatments if needed.

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“Area pharmacies are often open evenings and weekends and can provide same-day support over the phone, with most having rooms available for a private consultation. As well as saving you time, support from your community pharmacist is free. make appointments with your GP to see more urgent patients. If we think you need to see a GP, we will always advise you to do so.”

Following changes to the Minehead MIU, CCG has sought to assure patients that the new community pharmacists will not result in any planned closures within existing MIUs. A spokesperson said: “The Community Pharmacy Service at Somerset GP is a completely separate service, which was introduced by NHS England and is being rolled out locally in Somerset by the GCC, working with GPs and pharmacists community.

“It will not affect the MIUs and is not intended to replace them.” For more information on the Community Pharmacist Consultation Service, visit www.somersetccg.nhs.uk/community-pharmacy.

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BBC program highlights community pharmacy https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/bbc-program-highlights-community-pharmacy/ Wed, 18 May 2022 14:13:55 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/bbc-program-highlights-community-pharmacy/ The One Show on BBC One put community pharmacy in the spotlight, showcasing the sector’s vital work during the pandemic to prime-time TV audiences. The five-minute segment, which aired on May 10, featured Sutton pharmacist Reena Barai and a reception at St. James’s Palace for around 200 pharmacists, including Barai, hosted by the Prince of […]]]>

The One Show on BBC One put community pharmacy in the spotlight, showcasing the sector’s vital work during the pandemic to prime-time TV audiences.

The five-minute segment, which aired on May 10, featured Sutton pharmacist Reena Barai and a reception at St. James’s Palace for around 200 pharmacists, including Barai, hosted by the Prince of Wales on May 4.

“It was great to be a part of such a positive story,” said Barai, board member of the National Pharmacy Association (NPA).

“It is heartening that the national media is taking an interest in the sector, as it is too often neglected. Coverage like this both reflects public opinion and shapes it, which is why the NPA works so hard to keep us in the public eye.

The segment told the story of the role of community pharmacy during the pandemic and featured footage from a speech by the Prince of Wales, praising the sector for its contribution to the country’s healthcare.

“Pharmacists are people and places, not just pills, a place where science, so to speak, meets society. I just want to thank you all, more than I can say, for all you do so brilliantly to keep people healthy, and most importantly, save lives. Thank you all,” Prince Charles said at the reception.

Reena Barai (Picture: BBC screenshot)

The show delved into the sector by detailing the work Barai does in his pharmacy, a 43-year-old family business, which included delivering medicine to those protected and delivering Covid shots, among other things.

“Covid has caused the biggest change in [NHS’] the story. We’ve seen people come in when other parts of the NHS weren’t as accessible,’ she told the show.

“We are the only healthcare professional where you don’t need an appointment. You can just walk in.

Local resident Phil Roberts believes this is what saved his life. He walked into the pharmacy because he couldn’t get an appointment with his doctor when he felt ill while playing golf.

“I stayed here; Reena sat me down and took my blood pressure. It was high. She said, ‘please, please come up to the hospital. Reena saved me from having a stroke, there’s no doubt about that,” he said.

The show notes that almost half of Britons are more likely to go to their pharmacist than to the GP, saving doctors up to 24 million appointments a year.

“Over the past two years, almost everyone in this room has worked excessive hours. Some of them still work excessive hours today. And it’s fantastic for him (the Prince of Wales) to recognize that,” NPA chief executive Mark Lyonette said at the reception.

The commercial body worked with the BBC team for weeks to help make the show.

“The One Show is a flagship BBC program and the demographics of its millions of viewers closely match those of pharmacy users. I hope many pharmacists and pharmacy staff will watch the article and share it via social media as it is great publicity for the sector,” said NPA Communications Manager Stephen Fishwick.

The program can be seen on BBC iPlayer here.

If you would like to share your stories and/or experiences with us, please email [email protected]

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