Ravens jersey – Partner Pharmacy 24-7 http://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 05:01:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-70-120x120.png Ravens jersey – Partner Pharmacy 24-7 http://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/ 32 32 A quarter of hospitals have yet to refer patients to a ‘life-saving’ community pharmacy service https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/a-quarter-of-hospitals-have-yet-to-refer-patients-to-a-life-saving-community-pharmacy-service/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/a-quarter-of-hospitals-have-yet-to-refer-patients-to-a-life-saving-community-pharmacy-service/ More than a quarter of NHS trusts have yet to start referring patients to community pharmacies via the Discharge Medicine Service (DMS), a survey by The Pharmaceutical Journal found. The DMS, which allows community pharmacy teams to check if the drugs awaiting collection by a patient recently discharged from hospital are still appropriate and to […]]]>

More than a quarter of NHS trusts have yet to start referring patients to community pharmacies via the Discharge Medicine Service (DMS), a survey by The Pharmaceutical Journal found.

The DMS, which allows community pharmacy teams to check if the drugs awaiting collection by a patient recently discharged from hospital are still appropriate and to set up a consultation if necessary, launched as an essential service on February 15, 2021 (see box).

Guidance issued by NHS England ahead of rollout on 15 January 2021 said NHS trusts should be ‘ready to implement the NHS Discharge Medicines Service in February 2021’ and included suggested patient eligibility criteria.

However, responses to Freedom of Information (FOI) requests submitted by The Pharmaceutical Journal of 147 hospital trusts in England show that as of July 2022, 39 trusts (27%) had not yet implemented DMS.

Fourteen of these trusts said plans to set up the service were in the works and were due to start in late 2022, while two trusts said they were referring patients to the community pharmacy after they were discharged ‘by other means’ .

Six trusts said the DMS did not apply to them as community providers or specialist hospitals.

Thorrun Govind, chairman of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s English Pharmacy Board, said: “With continued pressure on the health service, there is a clear benefit for patients and the NHS in reducing potential harm from medicines during transfers of care and reduce the number of avoidable hospitalizations.

“The DMS highlights the key role of pharmacists working across the system to help patients with their medications, but if we are to help reduce health inequities, it is essential that new services are rolled out consistently. in all the countries.

But responses from the 102 NHS trusts that said they use DMS also revealed a wide variation in the types of patients to whom a referral is offered, with some trusts offering a DMS referral to every patient discharged, while others limit the offers to a group of patients. , such as those using controlled dosing systems (MDS).

Commenting on the results, Alistair Gray, pharmacist in charge of clinical services at East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust – which has referred at least 7,557 patients through the DMS since February 2021 – said that where the DMS is not in place, when referral of secondary school patients to primary care, “there is a risk that the information is not fully transcribed and this can end up in an inappropriate prescription, which could then end up being taken by the patient and having a [adverse] event…or they may not get the full health benefits if they run out of new drugs.”

He added: “It adds a few seconds to patient care, but those few seconds can save a life.”

Clare Howard, drug optimization manager at the Wessex Academic Health Science Network, who helped implement the similar design “Transfer of care around drugs” service in trusts between 2014 and 2021, said, “Trusts that expanded their criteria had a much better chance of doing ‘business as usual’.

“So places that are just starting out with monitor dosing systems, for example, tend to get a bit stuck there,” she said.

“It’s about sitting down and thinking, what do we have in our patch, who do we absolutely want to make sure they have access to this service, rather than limiting it to patients with MDS, because you might miss some high-risk patients who could really benefit.

According to NHS advice published in January 2021, patients taking high-risk medications, including blood thinners, antiepileptics and opioids, as well as those newly started on respiratory medications and those with a learning disability, should all be considered for a DMS guidance.

NHS England did not respond to requests for comment.

Box: How does the discharge medicine service work?

Once the referral has been received from the discharge hospital, community pharmacies can charge £12 to check and compare the medications the patient was discharged with with those prescribed prior to admission, ensuring that the medications pending collection are still appropriate.

Contractors are then paid £11 to check the first prescription received after discharge, taking into account any changes made while the patient was in hospital.

An additional payment of £12 is made once the pharmacist or pharmacy technician has carried out a consultation to check that the patient understands their new medication regimen.

Guidance for NHS trusts, published by NHS England on January 12, 2022, stated that patients “who receive this service are less likely to be readmitted (5.8% vs. 16% at 30 days), and spend fewer days in hospital (7.2 days on average vs. 13.1 days for patients who did not receive the service) where they are readmitted”.

In July 2021, an analysis of baseline data by NHS England suggested the discharge medication service could have helped prevent 17,238 hospital days in three months.

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The cost of drugs is increasing “unsustainably” for community pharmacy services https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/the-cost-of-drugs-is-increasing-unsustainably-for-community-pharmacy-services/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 17:21:12 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/the-cost-of-drugs-is-increasing-unsustainably-for-community-pharmacy-services/ COMMUNITY pharmacies in the north will not be able to afford common medicines for a few weeks without urgent intervention from the Ministry of Health due to “soaring prices”, it has been warned. Medicines to treat illnesses such as high blood pressure, coronary heart disease and mental illness may no longer be available due to […]]]>

COMMUNITY pharmacies in the north will not be able to afford common medicines for a few weeks without urgent intervention from the Ministry of Health due to “soaring prices”, it has been warned.

Medicines to treat illnesses such as high blood pressure, coronary heart disease and mental illness may no longer be available due to shortages and wholesale price hikes described as the worst in more than 30 years.

The cost of some drugs has increased fifty-fold, a community pharmacist said, adding that the situation was “unsustainable”.

An ‘immediate response’ is now required from Stormont, the Community Pharmacy NI group has warned, saying local outlets cannot afford rising costs, while staff are forced to spend time stocking up in drugs to the detriment of direct patient support.

The group also called for reform of pharmacy funding, including a new drug tariff for the distribution of drugs.

Community Pharmacy NI Managing Director Gerard Greene said, “The spike in drug prices we are currently experiencing requires an immediate response from the department. Community pharmacists cannot afford the price increase, especially when the department treats more patients.

“In addition to excessive costs, pharmacy teams are spending hours every day sourcing drugs when they could be using their clinical skills to directly support their patients.

“The community pharmacy network has a responsibility to keep patients safe at all times, and the threat to the supply of life-saving medicines is very real. It is now up to us to warn people of the risk to the supply of drugs for many drugs and to ask the public to understand that pharmacies are doing their best under impossible circumstances.”

East Belfast community pharmacist David McCrea said the steep rise in costs was the worst he had seen in three decades.

“It is becoming more and more difficult for us to afford to buy the drugs from wholesalers because we do not receive the full cost of these drugs from the department,” he said.

Mr McCrea, who runs Dundela Pharmacy, said: ‘I’ve seen the price of some drugs I have to buy for patients go up fifty times, but the department only pays a fraction of what I get invoice.

“With shortages and price increases affecting hundreds of drugs, I simply cannot afford to operate under the current model. It is causing financial stress, my credit limits with wholesalers are exceeded and it is simply unsustainable.

He added: “The bottom line is that we are now facing a situation where we will not be able to afford to provide our patients with essential medicines, within weeks.

A Department of Health spokesman said Health Minister Robin Swann was ‘very aware of the pressures facing community pharmacies’, adding that a new ‘support package’ was being prepared and had previously been introduced to Community Pharmacy NI.

They said there were “proven and reliable national and local mitigation arrangements to manage any supply distribution to ensure patients continue to get the medicines they need”.

The spokesperson said the new support package includes “immediate interventions worth more than £5.3 million, as well as a commitment to take forward broader reform arrangements”.

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Department of Health Response to Community Pharmacy NI Statement https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/department-of-health-response-to-community-pharmacy-ni-statement/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/department-of-health-response-to-community-pharmacy-ni-statement/ The Department of Health has released the following response to a statement from Community Pharmacy NI (CPNI) on drug supplies and sector funding. The Minister and Department of Health would like to reassure the public that there are proven and reliable national and local mitigation mechanisms to deal with any distribution of supplies to ensure […]]]>

The Department of Health has released the following response to a statement from Community Pharmacy NI (CPNI) on drug supplies and sector funding.

The Minister and Department of Health would like to reassure the public that there are proven and reliable national and local mitigation mechanisms to deal with any distribution of supplies to ensure that patients continue to get the drugs they need.

The minister and the ministry are very aware of the pressures facing community pharmacies.

The Minister and officials discussed the situation with Community Pharmacy NI (CPNI) representatives during a meeting last week.

The extent of the unprecedented budgetary pressures and uncertainty currently facing the Department was clarified.

Despite these pressures, Community Pharmacy NI was informed that a support program for their sector was being finalized. This package includes immediate interventions worth more than £5.3m, as well as a commitment to advance broader reform arrangements in conjunction with the CPNI.

It is therefore somewhat surprising to see the CPNI publicly claiming a package that it already knows is on its way.

Notes to editors:

  1. For media inquiries, please contact the DoH Press Office via email pressoffice@health-ni.gov.uk.
  2. Follow us on Twitter @healthdpt
  3. The Executive Information Service offers an after-hours service for media inquiries only between 6:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. Monday through Friday and weekends and holidays. The permanent press officer can be contacted on 028 9037 8110.

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Duo NPA Charac: Accelerating digitization in community pharmacies https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/duo-npa-charac-accelerating-digitization-in-community-pharmacies/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 16:38:25 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/duo-npa-charac-accelerating-digitization-in-community-pharmacies/ Charac, a unique NHS-integrated platform for independent community pharmacies, and the National Pharmacy Association (NPA) have announced their long-term partnership to enable pharmacies to provide the wide range of services needed to support the public. The NPA and Charac will work with NPA members and beyond to accelerate the necessary digital transition of independent community […]]]>

Charac, a unique NHS-integrated platform for independent community pharmacies, and the National Pharmacy Association (NPA) have announced their long-term partnership to enable pharmacies to provide the wide range of services needed to support the public.

The NPA and Charac will work with NPA members and beyond to accelerate the necessary digital transition of independent community pharmacies, especially given their importance to poorer communities and less advantaged people at high risk due to the potential pharmacy closures.

The partnership is part of the NPA’s efforts to improve community pharmacies’ online presence, including patient app, online booking, website design and a delivery service. With Charac also dedicated to improving digital interaction with patients, the new joint ecosystem will provide pharmacies with the necessary funding and cutting-edge technology to facilitate the delivery of primary care.

Due to the shortage of GPs and pressure on the NHS, pharmacies are needed more than ever. By 2026, all new pharmacy graduates will be qualified as prescribers, and with some 35 medical conditions no longer being prescribed by a GP, pharmacies have been heralded by the government as an alternative option for consultations. However, they must free up the capacity and the means to do so effectively.

One of the biggest opportunities to improve efficiency is to digitize certain tasks, to free up more time for patient care.

Charac can help you because it is an application designed specifically for community pharmacies, to stimulate growth, reduce time pressure and increase efficiency. Historically, pharmacies have focused on dispensing medications, but as the health needs of the population continue to evolve, pharmacies provide more holistic care, often involving clinical consultations.

Thanks to Charac, pharmacists are now able to manage prescription renewals as well as booking and conducting consultations in one place and can now access patient records, prescriptions and consultations in one place. Prescriptions can be delivered directly to a patient’s home thanks to Charac’s recent strategic investment of £1million from the Royal Mail.

The partnership with the NPA adds Charac’s innovative approach to patient engagement to the association’s business partner program, as one of 52 trusted partners.

Santosh Sahu, Founder of Charac, said, “We are delighted to announce our long-term partnership with such a respected and influential organization, especially at a time when the cost of living crisis, an impending recession and a period prolonged The NHS has created a perfect storm for the new Health Secretary. Greater recognition from the Ministry of Health of the vital role that pharmacists play in our healthcare ecosystem is essential and Charac is ready to ease these burdens by digitally empowering pharmacists.”

Simon Tebbutt, Membership Director at the postal code, said: “It is an exciting opportunity to work with a company with the ambition to make Charac one of our trusted partners. Charac presented an attractive solution to allow community pharmacies to modernize their platforms, and we look forward to working towards this common goal. It is vital that this market gap is filled: digital transformation has accelerated enormously over the last two years and has become a necessity in the healthcare sector, as evidenced by our partnerships with Charac. »

If you would like to share your stories and/or experiences with us, please email [email protected]

]]> NHS 111 minor injury referrals to community pharmacy begin https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/nhs-111-minor-injury-referrals-to-community-pharmacy-begin/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 15:38:03 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/nhs-111-minor-injury-referrals-to-community-pharmacy-begin/ NHS 111 online can now refer to the Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS) for minor illnesses. Monday’s rollout follows a six-month pilot project in several areas including Bristol, North Somerset, South Gloucestershire CCG and North ICP. Until now, the CPCS could only take referrals online for urgent drug supplies from NHS 111. In addition to […]]]>

NHS 111 online can now refer to the Community Pharmacist Consultation Service (CPCS) for minor illnesses.

Monday’s rollout follows a six-month pilot project in several areas including Bristol, North Somerset, South Gloucestershire CCG and North ICP.

Until now, the CPCS could only take referrals online for urgent drug supplies from NHS 111.

In addition to general practice, CPCS takes referrals from NHS 111, integrated urgent care clinical assessment services and, in some cases, patients through the 999 service.

It was launched by NHS England in October 2019, to facilitate patients having a same-day appointment with a community pharmacist for a minor illness or an urgent supply of regular medicine.

NHS England said it would improve access to services and provide more convenient treatment closer to patients’ homes, with the aim of easing pressure on GP appointments and emergency services.

He suggested that around 10% of online GP consultations could potentially be referred to pharmacies through the CPCS.

The first phase of CPCS offered patients the option of having a face-to-face or remote consultation with a pharmacist after an initial assessment by an NHS 111 call adviser.

Following a pilot project, was extended to include GP referrals in November 2020.

However, the Pharmacy Services Negotiating Committee (PSNC) told Pulse earlier this year that the referrals had been ‘burdensome’ for practices and that it was seeking to remove the need for a GP referral to the service. .

He suggested it could save 40million GP appointments a year.

More than 100,000 patients were seen by their street pharmacist in just one month according to new NHS figures.

In June, 118,123 people with minor ailments such as a sore throat or constipation, or in urgent need of medication, received a same-day consultation with their local pharmacist after calling NHS 111 or their general practitioner’s office, an increase of more than four-fifths. (83%) on the number during the same month last year. (64,512)

A version of this article was first published by sister title Pulse The pharmacist

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Community pharmacy best practices ‘floated at the top’ during the COVID-19 pandemic https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/community-pharmacy-best-practices-floated-at-the-top-during-the-covid-19-pandemic/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/community-pharmacy-best-practices-floated-at-the-top-during-the-covid-19-pandemic/ In an interview with Pharmacy Times® at the National Community Pharmacists Association annual conference, Carlie Traylor, director of strategic initiatives and student affairs at NCPA, discussed the growing role of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians and how COVID-19 has changed the landscape of services offered in community pharmacies. Q: What are the key takeaways from the […]]]>

In an interview with Pharmacy Times® at the National Community Pharmacists Association annual conference, Carlie Traylor, director of strategic initiatives and student affairs at NCPA, discussed the growing role of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians and how COVID-19 has changed the landscape of services offered in community pharmacies.

Q: What are the key takeaways from the NCPA Innovation Center/CPESN Community Pharmacy Fellowship?

Carlie Traylor: Some key takeaways for the Center for Innovation and Community Pharmacy Fellowship are that our work is your success. We try to meet members where they are and provide them with the resources and support they need to thrive. I like to use this phrase grow where you are planted. The scholarship program really does that when it creates a one-year program that has the structure, support, accountability, plus all the expertise you would need to be successful.

Q: How are point-of-care tests developing and how can pharmacies best use them?

Carlie Traylor: Point-of-care testing has been around for decades in community pharmacies, but it’s become absolutely vital during the COVID pandemic. For example, in our very first class, we had a pharmacy where you had to choose a capstone project. Their flagship project has already been chosen. They called me in a panic in November asking if they could move on to point-of-care testing. Absolutely. The Capstone project is intended to help pharmacy. This pharmacist now finances her entire position thanks to the income generated by this project. So that’s a testament to not only the value, but also the money-back potential of this service.

Q: How can pharmacies improve workflow to help ease the burden on pharmacists?

Carlie Traylor: So I’ll quote, The Great Travis Wolf, so owner in Oklahoma, he likes to say when’s the last time you went to the doctor and they took your weight? Right. When you go to a pharmacy, you have to be so efficient. Pharmacists are the most accessible, community pharmacists are the most accessible health care providers, and we should remain that way, but we should also have structure. Absolutely using all the different members of your team. I’m going to pitch something that I learned through the scholarship and our faculty actually collaborate with industrial engineers, especially industrial engineering students, because they’re all required to have a capstone project, and the pharmacy is absolutely perfect for this to analyze workflow and you will be shocked at the impact moving a bookcase 2 feet to the right can have.

Q: What are the roles of pharmacy technicians in pharmacy services as pharmacies continue to grow?

Carlie Traylor: Pharmacy technicians are absolutely essential as we expand these community services. The reason being that pharmacists are becoming more educated and have more expanded roles, they need their technicians to do the same. I have story after story of how the technicians were interventionist. I just spoke with 1 recently where I gave him a project I had heard about that reimburses the pharmacy $200 per patient who is identified for the diabetes prevention program. Within 2 hours, she had identified 3 patients. I’ve never had to work with a pharmacist to make this happen at this pharmacy earning $700 through the efforts of this technician connecting patients to the services they needed.

Q: How has COVID-19 changed the landscape of services offered within a community pharmacy, and do you think these service changes are here to stay post-pandemic?

Carlie Traylor: The COVID pandemic has been a trial by fire, and what I’ve seen is best practices have floated to the top. We’ve had grip packs, we’ve had delivery services, we’ve advocated for pharmacies to do it. If you weren’t doing them before the pandemic, you’re absolutely doing them now, and while I don’t think that necessarily increased the number of services, I think those services were there, it increased the impact and the number of participating pharmacies. I am so grateful to be part of a profession that has been so frontline in support during the pandemic. I am so proud of our members.

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‘No plans’ to grant state compensation to community pharmacy teams |Chemist+Drugist :: C+D https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/no-plans-to-grant-state-compensation-to-community-pharmacy-teams-chemistdrugist-cd/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 15:02:31 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/no-plans-to-grant-state-compensation-to-community-pharmacy-teams-chemistdrugist-cd/ The government recently launched a survey gather the opinion of healthcare professionals on regulated insurance and discretionary compensation schemes for the coverage of clinical negligence, which the General Council of Pharmacy has urged pharmacy professionals to complete. It follows a 2020 malpractice inquiry into surgeon Ian Paterson, which urged the government to, “urgently reform the […]]]>

The government recently launched a survey gather the opinion of healthcare professionals on regulated insurance and discretionary compensation schemes for the coverage of clinical negligence, which the General Council of Pharmacy has urged pharmacy professionals to complete.

It follows a 2020 malpractice inquiry into surgeon Ian Paterson, which urged the government to, “urgently reform the current regulation of healthcare professional compensation products”. […] and introduce a nationwide safety net to ensure that patients are not disadvantaged”.

Read more: RPS plans to offer personal professional liability insurance to its members

A DH spokesperson told C+D that the government is not currently considering changing state compensation measures to cover community pharmacy teams.

However, the findings of the investigation will help the DH to “determine how best to address the issues raised in the [Paterson] report,” they noted.

“We welcome responses from healthcare professionals, including those in community pharmacy teams, to improve our understanding of their current compensation and insurance arrangements,” the spokesperson added.

Survey to better understand the compensation market

The DH has published his answer to the Paterson Inquiry report in December, in which he pledged to “address issues related to compensation for healthcare professionals not covered by the government.

It also pledged to conduct a survey this year to better understand how healthcare professionals are compensated and insured, the spokesperson said.

The recommendations of the inquiry had focused on “improving access to compensation for patients, rather than extending the scope of state compensation”, they said.

The survey, which asks healthcare workers about their coverage, aims to improve DH’s “understanding of the compensation market and […] ensure that any future changes are in the best interests of patients and healthcare professionals,” he wrote on the survey’s homepage.

NPA: No gap in the indemnity cover market

Gareth Jones, director of corporate affairs for the National Pharmacy Association (NPA), told C+D today that the organization has discussed the Paterson investigation with the DH “to ensure that all healthcare professionals health have adequate compensation coverage”.

Read more: Pharma industry consulted on ‘risk-sharing’ compensation model for COVID bites, DH says

The NPA has informed the government that “fully regulated professional indemnity insurance products are already in place in community pharmacies”, he said.

“We don’t think there’s a gap to fill when it comes to community pharmacy coverage,” Jones said.

PDA: All pharmacists must have independent coverage

Paul Day, director of the Pharmacists’ Defense Association (PDA) – which offers its own private compensation cover for pharmacists – said he was unaware of the government investigation.

“All healthcare professionals should have their own independent coverage in place,” he added.

Examples such as the Peppermint Water Case – in which a pharmacist and a pre-registration intern were fined for issuing a prescription for peppermint water that resulted in the death of a baby – “demonstrate problems with employer coverage said Mr. Day.

Community pharmacy teams who participated in Phases 1 and 2 of the COVID-19 vaccination program were initially eligible for state-supported coverage under the Coronavirus Clinical Negligence Program (CNSC).

However, contractors must pay their indemnity coverage since phase 3 of the COVID-19 vaccination program.

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Systematic monitoring of opioid-related outcomes in community pharmacies presents opportunities https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/systematic-monitoring-of-opioid-related-outcomes-in-community-pharmacies-presents-opportunities/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 14:12:07 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/systematic-monitoring-of-opioid-related-outcomes-in-community-pharmacies-presents-opportunities/ With a simple intervention, pharmacists became compassionate and caring while their efficiency in treating patients improved. There is nothing wrong with being opportunistic. In fact, being opportunistic is generally good for your patients and your practice. Being an opportunist in pharmacy means helping to meet unmet needs and solve problems. We often think of value-added […]]]>

With a simple intervention, pharmacists became compassionate and caring while their efficiency in treating patients improved.

There is nothing wrong with being opportunistic. In fact, being opportunistic is generally good for your patients and your practice. Being an opportunist in pharmacy means helping to meet unmet needs and solve problems. We often think of value-added services such as those dealing with chronic diseases or with regard to public health initiatives, such as vaccination. Much has been said and done to address the problem of opioid abuse. This has included pharmacy, but there are still many patients who can be helped now and in the future, and the opportunity to do so presents itself almost daily.

In a study published in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, researchers piloted the implementation of a routine opioid outcome monitoring program (ROOM) facilitated by software. The study authors remind readers of the persistent problem of opioid abuse and its comorbidities such as depression, its concurrent problems such as alcohol and benzodiazepine abuse, and common adverse effects and quality of life issues such as constipation. Although extensive clinical assessment tools exist for opioid prescribers, methods to facilitate rapid and consistent use of opioid use monitoring are far less available.

The study authors used the theory of planned behavior to guide the design of clinical intervention that would increase pharmacists’ ability, motivation, and opportunity to identify and respond to opioid-related problems, and called ROOM given its ability to adapt to everyday life. practice. He used the use of software that prompted pharmacists to offer the ROOM tool to patients receiving a second or subsequent opioid prescription.

The ROOM tool consists of a few questions and screens to stratify patient risk. Pharmacists have been trained in its use and familiarization with the software. There were 64 pharmacists from 23 pharmacies who completed ROOM with 152 patients. Post-implementation, pharmacists reported being more confident in identifying patient risks and responding to patients who may develop addiction and depression, having more knowledge about naloxone, and being more comfortable with intervene when they are concerned about an opioid prescription. Patients who completed the ROOM tool at the pharmacy received an evaluation survey by email and indicated that it was easy to complete and provided useful information.

While there are many tools to aid in monitoring, care provided prospectively by pharmacists can add great value, elevate practice, and improve outcomes. The idea behind this intervention was not just to curb abuse, but also to help patients undergoing opioid treatment and to lessen adverse effects and shape behaviors that can lessen associated concomitant deleterious events. to the use of opioids. Rather than being the “opioid police,” pharmacists have proven to be compassionate and caring, while their efficiency in treating patients has improved.

This is an example of simple interventions that are an integral part of practice. Pharmacy managers can instill this kind of culture in the pharmacy, and pharmacy staff can show empathy and knowledge that will make patients more satisfied and, as a result, have a better life.

Additional information on value-added services as a component of improving the roles of pharmacists in public health and managing the technology that supports the medication use process can be found in Pharmacy Management: Essentials for All Practice Settings, 5th.

REFERENCE

Nielsen S, Picco L, Kowalski M, Sanfilippo P, et al. Routine monitoring of opioids in the community pharmacy: results of an open-label pilot study of the effectiveness of single-arm implementation. Res Social Admin Pharm. 2020;16(12):1694-1701.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Shane P. Desselle, RPh, PhD, FAPhAis Professor of Social and Behavioral Pharmacy at Touro University California College of Pharmacy.

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A community pharmacy in Wales has pledged a 4% funding increase subject to staff salary increases https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/a-community-pharmacy-in-wales-has-pledged-a-4-funding-increase-subject-to-staff-salary-increases/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 14:58:10 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/a-community-pharmacy-in-wales-has-pledged-a-4-funding-increase-subject-to-staff-salary-increases/ Community pharmacy teams in Wales could see a 4% pay rise retroactive to April 1, 2022, following a government commitment to increase contract funding for the sector in 2022/23. In a letter to all community pharmacies as of 7 September 2022, Andrew Evans, Chief Pharmaceutical Officer for Wales, said funding through the Community Pharmacy Contractual […]]]>

Community pharmacy teams in Wales could see a 4% pay rise retroactive to April 1, 2022, following a government commitment to increase contract funding for the sector in 2022/23.

In a letter to all community pharmacies as of 7 September 2022, Andrew Evans, Chief Pharmaceutical Officer for Wales, said funding through the Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework (CPCF) in 2022/2023 would increase by a “further 2% taking into account taking into account the increase in costs and allowances for a total of 4% compared to 2021/2022”.

This will increase annual funding for the CPCF from £154.2m to £157.2m, the letter says.

In 2020, the Welsh Government announced a three-year deal which promised to increase funding by 2%, from £151.2m in 2021/22 to £154.2m in 2022/23.

The uprising comes after Health Minister Eluned Morgan said in a press release dated July 22, 2022 that staff working in community pharmacies should receive ‘a fair, proportionate and equitable pay rise’ in line with that offered to all NHS staff under the terms and conditions of the Agenda for Change.

In July 2022, the NHS Pay Review Body recommended raising the pay of all NHS Agenda for Change staff in England – including hospital pharmacists – by £1,400, which the Unite union says “works at 4% for those in the middle wage brackets”.

In the letter, Evans said the Health Minister’s statement “was explicit in setting out the expectation that increased funding would lead to increased pay for community pharmacy teams”.

He added that the increase in funding “is therefore conditional on each community pharmacy employer ‘granting a salary increase of at least 4%’ to all employed staff directly involved in the direct provision of NHS pharmacy services. ” and be backdated to April 1, 2022.

‘Any member of staff with a basic annual salary of over £45,839 can receive a pay rise of less than 4% provided the increase is at least £1,400…similar to the salary of NHS staff’ , he said, adding that the government “will claw back additional funds from contractors where wage increases have not been implemented”.

The letter added that the funding would be “applied to the various elements of the CPCF,” including through clinical services, the pharmacist-independent prescribing service, and the quality and safety system.

Commenting on the additional funding, Paul Day, director of the Pharmacists’ Defense Association, said: ‘While incentivizing private community pharmacy contractors to raise wages no worse than the government’s plans for their own employees, it’ is better than accepting that they might otherwise do worse. than the NHS, it could also be seen as sending a message to NHS employed pharmacists, who are also represented by the PDA, that the Welsh Government is not listening to their response to the NHS pay proposal.

“Some community pharmacy employers are part of large, for-profit multinational corporations, which may have already decided to grant this level of salary increase due to recruitment and retention pressures.

“In such scenarios, the Welsh Government reimburses these expenses, which will support these employers’ profit margins and have no impact on pay rates.”

In August 2022, Unite began voting with hospital pharmacists across England and Wales on whether NHS staff should take industrial action against the government’s plan to raise wages by at least £1,400 in 2022/2023.

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Community pharmacy workers in Wales will get a pay rise https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/community-pharmacy-workers-in-wales-will-get-a-pay-rise/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 14:07:18 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/community-pharmacy-workers-in-wales-will-get-a-pay-rise/ The Government is adding a further £3m to the 2022/23 Community Pharmacy funding pot, Chief Pharmaceutical Officer Andrew Evans wrote in a letter to entrepreneurs earlier this week (September 7). But access to this funding will be conditional on the “implementation by employers of a salary bonus for staff”, added Mr. Evans. More details include: […]]]>

The Government is adding a further £3m to the 2022/23 Community Pharmacy funding pot, Chief Pharmaceutical Officer Andrew Evans wrote in a letter to entrepreneurs earlier this week (September 7).

But access to this funding will be conditional on the “implementation by employers of a salary bonus for staff”, added Mr. Evans. More details include:

  • Employees directly involved in pharmaceutical services must receive a salary increase of “at least” 4% – however, this increase does not need to include non-employees, area or regional directors, or staff head office support
  • Those with an annual salary of more than £45,839 can get a raise of less than 4%, but this should be at least £1,400 – pro-rated for staff working less than 40 hours a week –” in line with NHS staff pay. ”
  • The increase must be effective from April 1 this year, “and if necessary be backdated and must be consolidated”.

The Welsh Government will work with the NHS Wales Shared Services Partnership to verify that these wage increases have been implemented by pharmacy owners.

It will take over funding where pay rises have not been given, Mr Evans warned.

How will additional funding be provided to entrepreneurs?

The government’s additional £3m investment will increase 2022/23 funding for pharmacies to £157.2m.

Fees paid to providers for clinical services, pharmacist-independent prescribing services, the quality and safety regime, and the collaborative working regime will all increase by 4%.

Meanwhile, the labor incentive fee will increase by 2%, retroactive to April 2022, Mr Evans wrote.

He reminded entrepreneurs that when the salary increase was announced in July for NHS staff in Wales, Health Minister Eluned Morgan said community pharmacy teams would also receive a “fair, proportionate and equitable pay rise”.

Community Pharmacy Wales welcomes the additional funding, contract services manager Judy Thomas told C+D.

Ms Morgan’s commitment to ensuring pharmacy teams also receive a pay rise – despite the sector not falling under the remit of the NHS pay review body – “is a testament to the hard work of pharmacy staff community during a very difficult time,” added Ms. Thomas.

In July, pharmaceutical bodies expressed concern after public sector pay rises announced for England failed to take into account the community pharmacy sector.

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