Ravens sweatshirt – Partner Pharmacy 24-7 http://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 15:29:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-70-120x120.png Ravens sweatshirt – Partner Pharmacy 24-7 http://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/ 32 32 5 strategies to modernize a hospital pharmacy https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/5-strategies-to-modernize-a-hospital-pharmacy/ Sun, 24 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/5-strategies-to-modernize-a-hospital-pharmacy/ Hospital pharmacy upgrading projects are among the most difficult and complicated for healthcare providers, due to extensive regulations, infrastructure limitations and inevitable setbacks. In past projects we’ve encountered everything from changed code requirements that changed mid-project to mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) systems that needed to be replaced unexpectedly. Upgrading a pharmacy to achieve USP […]]]>

Hospital pharmacy upgrading projects are among the most difficult and complicated for healthcare providers, due to extensive regulations, infrastructure limitations and inevitable setbacks. In past projects we’ve encountered everything from changed code requirements that changed mid-project to mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) systems that needed to be replaced unexpectedly.

Upgrading a pharmacy to achieve USP 797-800 compliance requires a commitment to flexibility, while maintaining the highest level of quality. The safety of hospital staff and patients is at stake, and there is no room for error. The pharmacy design approach should be focused on effectively treating a variety of different problems that may arise in the process.

Here are five ways to get it right:

Promptly inform regulators

It is not enough to be able to name the names of the agencies that regulate pharmacy upgrades in your state. You should also understand their specific strategies for approving these projects in order to anticipate and avoid conflicts. Are regulators overloaded due to understaffing? Do they have a new management which now applies a more stringent approach on key elements?

Your team should include veterans of the project approval process who can tell you what they’ve observed. In California, for example, pharmacies must be licensed by the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), soon to be renamed Department of Health Care Access and Information (HCAI), which oversees the construction of health care. They must also be licensed by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and the state Board of Pharmacy.

To help the customer fully understand the implications of code requirements, it is essential to prepare a code compliance log that is updated at each design phase. This type of documentation is useful, especially if regulations need to be updated or changed while a project is in progress. Another way to avoid issues is to prepare room data sheets (one sheet per room) that capture all of the design requirements for each space being renovated. Once completed, the part data ‘book’ can also be used as a valuable reference document to help explain everything about the project, such as existing conditions, staging requirements, and other construction requirements. coordination of facilities.

Many design companies may not care about this level of detail. We have found that including chamber datasheets in our OSHPD preliminary reviews helps give them a more complete understanding of how the project was put together and the extent of the phased work that will take place in a future. about a year.

Examine existing infrastructure and make tough calls

For any pharmacy upgrade, it is essential to be pragmatic and realistic about whether existing MEP systems can be retained. This is especially true in older hospitals where older recording drawings may not reflect current conditions.

To remedy this situation, we believe that the best strategy is to start with a thorough assessment of the condition of the facilities and a feasibility study. Don’t be surprised if this process takes 5-8 weeks, but it will be time well spent. The aim is to detect and deal with any unforeseen conditions that may have a negative impact on the project budget.

It is common to find systems that are old or have been incorrectly repaired or replaced. Be prepared to make tough calls about systems that are past their useful life and need to be removed and replaced. Then you can schedule the changes you need right away instead of having to rearrange everything after discovering a problem.

Consider alternatives to temporary pharmacies

In many upgrades, hospitals are building temporary pharmacies that can be in place for six months to a year. As hospital administrators are well aware, this can be a complicated, labor-intensive and costly process; the rules are the same for temporary and permanent pharmacies. But alternatives may allow you to keep pharmacy staff and equipment in place until the new facility is ready to move in. A key consideration is to identify services that do not need to be located in the hospital, where space is at a premium. Can they be moved to an offsite location instead?

For example, if you could move the administration elsewhere, such as an office building on campus or on the street, it would allow you to reclaim that space for the permanent pharmacy. Administrative areas are much cheaper to move. You can even move them in a trailer outside until a permanent home is found. These strategies can reduce project time and be less disruptive to pharmacy staff.

Prepare for new technological needs

An upgraded pharmacy might not immediately need a data port or extra cabling space, but the future may be another story. New equipment may need to be installed. Will you be able to add more bandwidth? Will you be able to provide sufficient connectivity? Always keep these questions in mind and allow for as much flexibility in the future as possible.

One approach is to plan for additional expansion space in computer rooms to handle more downstream capacity. This kind of anticipation goes beyond an additional outlet here or there. Consider what you might need in 5-10 years and even beyond for the whole space.

Clear the way for future renovations

Things often change during construction. As we have seen in our pharmacy projects, a prep room can be omitted or a refrigerator can be added. You have to imagine how things will change and when a renovation will be needed. We must act now to make this process as smooth as possible.

The best strategy is to commit to thoroughly documenting the construction process, especially any changes made to the original plans. By creating a BIM model, we can provide digital documentation on each asset that can be archived. In addition to helping facilitate construction sequencing, by taking full advantage of the model, the owner will be able to export a project inventory that lists every door, light fixture, outlet installed that may require maintenance.

Photo: LPA Design Studios


Source link

]]>
Building a Successful Hospital Pharmacy Analysis Program https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/building-a-successful-hospital-pharmacy-analysis-program/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/building-a-successful-hospital-pharmacy-analysis-program/ A strong hospital pharmacy analytics program can improve drug use and advance patient care. In a webinar hosted by Becton Dickinson on June 16, 2021, pharmacy executives discussed the essential elements of high-performing pharmaceutical analytics programs and how hospital pharmacy departments can develop them to make operational, clinical and decision-making decisions. financial. Joe Lassiter, PharmD, […]]]>

A strong hospital pharmacy analytics program can improve drug use and advance patient care. In a webinar hosted by Becton Dickinson on June 16, 2021, pharmacy executives discussed the essential elements of high-performing pharmaceutical analytics programs and how hospital pharmacy departments can develop them to make operational, clinical and decision-making decisions. financial.

Joe Lassiter, PharmD, MS, president of The Robertson Group, LLC, based in Portland, Ore., Kicked off the presentation by emphasizing the need for pharmaceutical analyzes. “In 2019, [the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists] launched the Practice Advancement Initiative, or PAI, 2030 in the continuity of [its] Models of practice initiative to guide and ensure that practitioners and leaders [‘meet the demands of future practice and patient care delivery models’]”, explained Lassiter.

Technology and data science are among the 5 areas of these recommendations, with several suggestions that offer applications of pharmaceutical analysis in practice and discuss the need for a computer literate workforce and analysis, according to Lassiter. However, despite the importance of well-developed pharmaceutical testing programs, starting the process can be daunting, especially for services with limited resources.

To start

During the webinar roundtable, pharmacy executives emphasized the importance of getting started, no matter where you are in the process. “[Three years ago] we were really specific in how we performed our analyzes… we could barely access our data, ”said Chad Hatfield, PharmD, MHA, BCPS, director of pharmacy, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, Calif. “[We] went from the days of cavemen to a rocket that’s now trying to send someone to Mars. “

According to Hatfield, UC Davis’s analytics program grew out of a partnership with the IT team’s infrastructure outside of pharmacy. The program was built on the backbone of the healthcare system using the existing commercial data visualization tool, Tableau. Leveraging existing third-party solutions like this can be a beneficial strategy at the start.

“I recommend that you pay close attention to where your organization invests its money in regards to these apps and align yourself accordingly,” Lassiter said. He added that pharmacies can use a mixed approach of the following options to help kickstart their pharmaceutical analyzes:

  • Third party solutions
  • Supplier partnerships
  • Regional collaboration
  • Internal staff with specialized skills

Jeffrey Chalmers, PharmD, senior director of pharmaceutical informatics and technology at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, said his pharmacy department turned to a pharmaceutical analysis program after implementing a platform -More modern electronic medical records form. “Over the years, the demands [for data] has become more complex, ”he said. His organization’s specialty pharmacy implementation also fueled the need for a more robust program when he realized the need for data from multiple sources, in order to “be able to manipulate that data in different ways.” .

Getting the program started is a challenge, but securing additional resources to develop the program can be another obstacle. Developing dedicated staff, whether internal experts or recruited resources, can help move the process forward.

Develop your program

All webinar panelists agreed that the necessary stakeholder partnerships were essential to support the growth of their pharmaceutical analytics programs and teams. “We have heavily engaged our business intelligence institute,” Chalmers said. “They have a lot of programmers [and] data scientists in their team. [We] started by meeting with these groups to understand what kinds of skills we would need.

Hatfield said internal discussions with financial stakeholders, such as the CFO and the IT team, were crucial in communicating the needs of the program. Chalmers recommended highlighting the opportunities for cost savings with the use of drugs to gain adherence.

“We were able to leverage the data to increase efficiency and use drugs more appropriately and show cost savings,” he said. “We continued to use this to gain more momentum and ultimately get approval for additional resources.” Chalmers explained how, during the COVID-19 pandemic, the analysis team built a drug inventory dashboard that allows near real-time monitoring of inventory levels of hard-to-acquire drugs. Identifying early opportunities to present successful projects to leadership teams in organizations has helped build support for the growth of the program, Chalmers explained.

Demonstrate the value

Proposing and justifying a pharmaceutical analysis program to the C-suite team may require demonstrating value and answering ROI questions. Chalmers and Hatfield agreed that focusing on limiting revenues and costs is particularly crucial to justify the importance of the program.

Chalmers explained that at the Cleveland Clinic, a lot of time was spent trying to increase the catch rates of doctors prescribing at the organization’s outpatient pharmacies. “We have 26 pharmacies in Northeast Ohio, but only capture about 11% of prescriptions prescribed by physicians at the Cleveland Clinic,” he said. Chalmers added that by performing baseline analysis, it was determined that every 1% increase in catch rate resulted in a net profit of about $ 1 million per year.

“Well, it catches the attention of a lot of people,” he said. Next, a dashboard was created to display capture rates by clinic, institute, and specialty, which allowed the team to identify areas with high and low performance.

Getting that initial trust from the leadership team and then being able to report the data is critical, Hatfield says. “When I told you I could save $ 10 million on inpatient drug expenses, then I came back and we made $ 12 [million] last year, and we did it because we had these [individuals] in place, it was really more revealing for us to help us keep moving forward with our program, ”he said.

Building relationships for success

One of the key questions in proposing a pharmaceutical analysis program is to determine the organizational structure. The programs can be based in pharmacy, computer science or shared between the 2 departments. “All of our IT programming, including our reporting and analysis teams, reports to me and I report to the director of pharmacy, but not everyone has that structure,” Chalmers said.

However, he stressed that the most important aspect is not who you report to but the relationship between the responsible parties and the pharmacy department. For example, its reporting and analysis teams participate in weekly pharmacy operations meetings and meet regularly with the clinical team and residents. “I don’t think it matters that they’re pharmacy or IT, as long as that dynamic exists,” Chalmers said.

Lassiter agreed that these relationships are essential because the exact structure of the program will be unique to each organization. “The organizational nuances are too specific to be able to have just one model,” he said. He noted that successful programs might have an IT manager with a dual reporting role in pharmacy and IT or a pharmacist serving on a business analysis team. Whatever the hierarchical structure, what matters most is the link with the pharmacy, he said.

The future of pharmaceutical analysis

As pharmacy teams develop their analytics, Lassiter noted that having a strong program doesn’t necessarily mean “death by dash.” To prioritize efficiency and reduce information overload, Lassiter recommended making sure everyone in the organization is focused by asking specific questions such as, “What are the issues we’re trying to tackle?” to resolve ? What are we going to watch? How do we measure it and how do we visualize it? Chalmers agreed, noting that dashboards won’t go away anytime soon; it’s about moving them forward to function more efficiently so that they can perform multiple functions.

On the future of data, Hatfield and Chalmers both highlighted the move towards predictive analytics. Hatfield added that some of these tools exist now, but is ultimately moving towards using them on a larger scale to add a predictive element to their reports.

Chalmers cited his team’s inventory experience amid the COVID-19 pandemic as an example of the benefits of predictive analytics. “Inventory, in general, is something that I think lends itself well to a type of predictive tool, because we can see trends over time, things that change from season to season,” a- he declared. As data and analytics reporting evolves, pharmacy teams will be able to better predict and prepare for what to expect, which will ultimately translate into cost savings and improved performance. improved patient care.

Reference

  1. Kvancz D, Lassiter J, Romero G, Chalmers J, Hatfield C. Analytics – the key to high performing pharmacy programs. Becton Dickinson webinar. June 16, 2021. Accessed June 16, 2021. https://go.bd.com/analytics_key_high_performing_pharmacy_programs.html


Source link

]]>
Falsified paperwork distributed in the nurse’s hospital pharmacy https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/falsified-paperwork-distributed-in-the-nurses-hospital-pharmacy/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/falsified-paperwork-distributed-in-the-nurses-hospital-pharmacy/ A nurse’s attempt to divert oxycodone was foiled by a patient who wanted to see her medication before discharge A nurse was convicted of professional misconduct and disability after falsifying oxycodone scripts and attempting to take oxycodone intended for a patient. The nurse was working at a hospital in Western Australia when in November 2018 […]]]>

A nurse’s attempt to divert oxycodone was foiled by a patient who wanted to see her medication before discharge

A nurse was convicted of professional misconduct and disability after falsifying oxycodone scripts and attempting to take oxycodone intended for a patient.

The nurse was working at a hospital in Western Australia when in November 2018 she attempted to divert four 5 mg oxycodone tablets and 10 500 mg paracetamol tablets intended for a patient who was going out that evening, to bring them home.

The nurse and a colleague, identified in a WA State Administrative Court transcript as Nurse A, went to the hospital emergency department medication room together that day.

“The Respondent removed a blister pack of ibuprofen tablets from a cabinet in the medication room, pushed four ibuprofen tablets out of the blister pack in her right hand, then returned the blister pack to the drug room. cabinet ”, the transcript reads.

“With the four ibuprofen tablets in her right hand, the Respondent walked to the medication cabinet in Schedule 8, unlocked it with a key, opened the cabinet and took a blister pack of oxycodone 5 mg tablets. “

She asked nurse A to get an envelope for the patient’s take-out medication, which the other nurse did.

“While alone in the medication room and with the Schedule 8 medication cabinet open, the Respondent pushed four 5 mg oxycodone tablets out of the blister pack in her left hand,” noted the Tribunal.

“When Nurse A entered the medication room with an envelope, the Respondent dropped a strip of ten 500 mg paracetamol tablets and the four ibuprofen tablets from her right hand into the envelope. The Respondent told Nurse A that the envelope should be sealed.

“Nurse A and the Respondent left the medication room to hand over the medication envelope to the patient. At that time, the Respondent had hidden the four oxycodone 5 mg tablets in his hand or in his pocket. “

But the patient demanded to see the medication to take away before the envelope was sealed, and when Nurse A opened it, she saw that it contained ibuprofen, not oxycodone.

The two nurses returned to the medication room, where Nurse A asked about the medication and her colleague took the oxycodone out of her pocket and put it in the envelope, saying she ” had to mix the tablets “.

The following year, in April, the nurse falsified a script for 20 oxycodone 10 mg tablets on behalf of Ms B, an outpatient.

She had obtained a blank script from the hospital and used the name and prescribing physician number of a physician who worked there to forge the script, including Ms. B’s personal information.

She wrote on that prescription, “Oxycodone 10 mg TDS / PRN 20 capsules”.

She introduced him to a hospital pharmacy, allegedly signing him as Ms. B’s agent, paying and taking the capsules.

The following month, in May 2019, she forged two scripts for a total of 40 10 mg oxycodone capsules on behalf of two former patients at the hospital.

To do this, she modified two blank scripts by crossing out the original doctor’s prescribing information and writing on behalf of another who worked at the hospital, using that doctor’s prescriber number.

On one she wrote the personal data of a former patient and on the other she affixed a sticker with the personal data of another former patient.

Again, she wrote, “Oxycodone 10 mg TDS / PRN 20 capsules” and signed and dated the scripts as a prescribing physician.

Later that day, she had the scripts distributed at the hospital pharmacy, taking oxycodone for her personal use.

Five days later, AHPRA received a notification about the conduct.

In June 2019, the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s Immediate Action Committee imposed a condition on her registration that she did not practice as a nurse until she was deemed fit to do so.

The Tribunal heard that the nurse had a disability – a substance use disorder (opioids) and an adjustment disorder – that interfered or was likely to interfere with her ability to practice safely.

She told the Tribunal that these health conditions were developed in response to “a series of traumatic events” in her life and that they were treated as part of treatment.

She said her substance abuse disorder was in remission with the help of a buprenorphine / naloxone mixture and psychological therapy, while her adjustment disorder was currently in remission with the help of psychological therapy.

The Tribunal made the decision to reprimand the nurse and to cancel her registration. She will not be able to reapply for registration before 12 months.

She was also ordered to pay costs of $ 2,000.


Source link

]]>
Wrexham Maelor Hospital Pharmacy Releases Fourth Edition Of Trusted Clinical Guidelines Sold Worldwide https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/wrexham-maelor-hospital-pharmacy-releases-fourth-edition-of-trusted-clinical-guidelines-sold-worldwide/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/wrexham-maelor-hospital-pharmacy-releases-fourth-edition-of-trusted-clinical-guidelines-sold-worldwide/ Wrexham.com> News Posted: Wed 25 Aug 2021 A clinical guide that has become a “bestseller” for the Pharmacy Department at Wrexham Maelor Hospital is being published in its fourth edition this month. NEWTs are a resource for healthcare professionals and caregivers to help people with swallowing problems. It is on the UK Medicines Information essential […]]]>

Wrexham.com> News

Posted: Wed 25 Aug 2021

A clinical guide that has become a “bestseller” for the Pharmacy Department at Wrexham Maelor Hospital is being published in its fourth edition this month.

NEWTs are a resource for healthcare professionals and caregivers to help people with swallowing problems.

It is on the UK Medicines Information essential resource list because it has become highly respected and used by healthcare professionals around the world.

Jennifer Smyth, pharmacist at Wrexham Maelor Hospital, said: “We are very proud to see the advice, which began as a local project, become a recognized reference source that benefits patients and healthcare professionals alike. countries and around the world. .

“Swallowing problems affect a large number of patients and it is important to help them take their medication safely and effectively. These guidelines provide a one-stop-shop for healthcare professionals and caregivers to find the information they need on a daily basis to help people with swallowing problems.

NEWTs began over nineteen years ago as a guide for nurses in Wrexham caring for patients unable to take tablet medication.

Nurses wanted to know if it was safe to crush the tablets (or open the capsules) so that the drug could be administered to patients with difficulty swallowing or to enteral feeding tubes. At the time, no information had been published on the subject, but the same questions kept coming up.

Hospital pharmacist Brenda Murphy gathered answers to the most common questions and developed a set of guidelines for her colleagues, covering 84 different medications.

This initial work was developed by his colleague Jennifer with each new query researched and added to the guidelines. Copies of the guidelines were shared with pharmacists in other centers, in exchange for any local protocols or experiences they might share with the project.

As a result, the range of drugs covered by the guidelines has grown steadily, and in 2006 it covered more than 500 different drugs.

At this point, the book has been professionally printed and released for sale for the first time, making it readily available to other healthcare organizations. About 900 copies were sold, or donated to associates and contributors.

An updated second edition included information on 100 other drugs and sold around 2,500 copies in the UK and overseas, with copies being shipped to Israel, Iceland, Malaysia, Australia and New Zealand.

In 2011, the guidelines were published in electronic form under the NEWT website name, making them readily available to any healthcare organization and allowing them to be easily updated so that subscribers have immediate access to the latest. information.

With the third edition, published in 2015, still in demand, the Pharmacy Department at Wrexham Maelor Hospital updated the book to produce a fourth edition, giving print users access to all of the updated information from the website.

Did you spot something? Do you have a story? Send a Facebook message | A direct message on Twitter | Email News@Wrexham.com



Source link

]]>
Hospital pharmacy operates under pressure as mass vaccination gains momentum https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/hospital-pharmacy-operates-under-pressure-as-mass-vaccination-gains-momentum/ Tue, 13 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/hospital-pharmacy-operates-under-pressure-as-mass-vaccination-gains-momentum/ With the arrival of June 1, 2021, Australia faces a second winter in the cold shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic. There are plenty of reasons to feel more optimistic about the colder months ahead, even as the newly literate variants are wreaking havoc with the proven 2020 approaches to containment. Following the federal government’s strategic […]]]>
Hospital pharmacy operates under pressure as mass vaccination gains momentum

With the arrival of June 1, 2021, Australia faces a second winter in the cold shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic. There are plenty of reasons to feel more optimistic about the colder months ahead, even as the newly literate variants are wreaking havoc with the proven 2020 approaches to containment.

Following the federal government’s strategic change in May, the deployment of the COVID-19 vaccine in Australia is gaining momentum and, as they have been since phase 1a, pharmacists and hospital technicians find themselves at the center of the largest initiative Health Center in Australian History.

This is not a figurative notion: in the vast expanses of civic spaces normally used for exhibitions and indoor sports, the hospital pharmacy often directs the establishment and operation of the mass vaccination clinics run. by the state.

State and territory clinics use vaccines from Pfizer and AstraZeneca, requiring immense logistics skills as well as unmatched, specialized drug management expertise.

Separated from hospitals and their physical resources, hospital pharmacists must take everything into account: drug safety, maintaining the supply of the cold chain, aseptic reconstitution, emergency power, supply of equipment , workforce and workflow optimization.

In many cases, hospital pharmacists take charge of vaccine preparation rather than letting vaccinators do it at the time of administration, thus maximizing the workforce of vaccinators and helping to ensure that demand for vaccines. vaccination is satisfied.

At the start of winter 2021, the reporting of other milestones shows the impact of the constant increase in production in these clinics – up to 60,000 doses per week in some large centers: two million doses administered in state and territory-run clinics, contributing five million doses administered in total. While this is paltry compared to the original goals, the momentum is clear. The first million doses were delivered to clinics across the state and territory in 90 days, while the second million took less than 30 days.

Winter sees another blow to the arm as the campaign for the second dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine begins, leading to a sharp rise in the percentage of Australians fully vaccinated.

Of course, there is a long way to go.

The deployment of the COVID-19 vaccine is incredibly complex in terms of scale and scope, and it is essential that government and healthcare professionals continue to make strategic changes in response to new safety data.

The revised national approach from April – in which the AstraZeneca vaccine is offered to Australians aged 50 and over in public clinics and respiratory clinics, while Pfizer vaccines remain a priority for Australians under 50 in phases 1a and 1b until supplies increase in the second half of the year – means the full and complementary strengths of Australia’s acute and primary health care sectors will not be used in symbiosis before a few months to come.

Phase 2a began in May, which saw all Australians over the age of 50 eligible for a vaccine, and by early June, the campaign for the second dose of AstraZeneca’s vaccine had started, resulting in a significant increase in rates of Australians fully vaccinated in the following weeks.

At the same time, several jurisdictions, including New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory, have moved ahead of the national deployment plan and allowed Australians aged 40 to 49 to be eligible – for now, this cohort will be vaccinated exclusively in state and territory clinics, as the only facility providing Pfizer vaccine. South Australians between the ages of 16 and 49 living in non-metropolitan areas can also receive the Pfizer vaccine at state-run clinics.

As the deployment in community pharmacies is delayed until September 2021, hospital pharmacists are currently carrying the flag of the profession in this vital program. The Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia (SHPA) continues to support our members as they work with their hospital colleagues to develop state government vaccination centers in strategic and high impact locations.

When winter gives way to spring, the recalibrated strategy will truly exploit the responsiveness of all pharmacists to the needs of the populations they serve, wherever they live.

It’s too early to predict next summer, but we can take comfort in the fact that we have the science – and the momentum – on our side.

Image credit: © Pharmacie GRIT, republished from volume 5, numbers 1-2 (fall-winter 2021).


Source link

]]>
2 leaders in hospital pharmacy on the causes and solutions to drug shortages https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/2-leaders-in-hospital-pharmacy-on-the-causes-and-solutions-to-drug-shortages/ Tue, 15 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/2-leaders-in-hospital-pharmacy-on-the-causes-and-solutions-to-drug-shortages/ Shortages of essential medicines are a challenge that hospitals have always faced, but the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists has predicted that trade restrictions, pandemics and climate change will only increase the potential for further shortages. With continued uncertainty about the stability and quality of the pharmaceutical supply chain, the pharmacist in hospitals and in […]]]>

Shortages of essential medicines are a challenge that hospitals have always faced, but the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists has predicted that trade restrictions, pandemics and climate change will only increase the potential for further shortages.

With continued uncertainty about the stability and quality of the pharmaceutical supply chain, the pharmacist in hospitals and in the healthcare system must be prepared for “significant disruptions to the normal delivery of healthcare, including a disruption of health care. drug supply, ”Erin Fox, PharmD, Senior Director of Drug Information and Support. health departments at the University of Utah Health in Salt Lake City, wrote, with Aaron Kesselheim, MD, a doctor of internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, in a report published in February in the American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy.

Dr Fox, who is part of the team that provides all content for the company’s drug shortage tracking, as well as Jennifer Tryon, PharmD, chief pharmacist at Wake Forest Baptist Health in Winston-Salem, North Carolina , recently spoke with Becker Hospital Examination on the causes of drug shortages, changes to the pharmaceutical supply chain to reduce shortages and provided advice to hospital pharmacy executives to manage shortages.

What causes drug shortages?

There is a combination of factors at play that causes a shortage, including quality issues in drug factories. More than 50 percent of drug shortages are caused by a manufacturing problem, Dr. Fox said.

Eli Lilly’s manufacturing facility in Branchburg, NJ, where it makes its COVID-19 drug bamlanivimab and its bestselling diabetes drug Trulicity recently made headlines with quality concerns. The plant was subpoenaed by the US Department of Justice in May after being flagged for quality control issues following two separate inspections by the FDA. The company has also faced allegations from factory workers that a high-quality official altered documents to minimize these issues.

Emergent BioSolutions, previously a largely unknown Maryland-based biopharmaceutical company, also made headlines after its manufacturing facility mixed ingredients from AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine with ingredients for Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine, ruining 15 million doses. After an inspection, the FDA cited a number of quality issues with the plant.

Dr Tryon said consolidation among drugmakers is also a major disruptor causing shortages. There are simply fewer companies making drugs. The low profitability of manufacturing generic drugs and high government regulations make the pharmaceutical market difficult, she said.

The most common drugs in short supply, Dr. Fox said, are the inexpensive injectable generic drugs that have long been used in hospitals, such as lidocaine or saline. Brand name drugs are so expensive that companies have an incentive to build the resilience of their supply chains, she said. They have a back-up plan so they never run out of brand name drugs.

What would make it easier to predict when a drug will be in short supply?

Greater transparency in the pharmaceutical supply chain would make it easier to forecast shortages, Dr Fox said. Many elements of drug manufacturing are completely opaque and are considered proprietary secrets, such as the source of raw materials and the list of pharmaceuticals made in a specific factory, according to Dr. Fox.

Because there are so many secrets, it’s impossible to have the metrics needed to do predictive modeling to know when a drug will be in short supply.

Drugmakers are required to disclose more information to the FDA than is made public, and the agency works to avoid certain shortages when it detects drugs vulnerable to a shortage, according to Dr. Fox. The FDA can take actions such as approving another drug manufacturer to manufacture a certain drug or authorizing imported products.

Hospital pharmacy executives with more visibility into the pharmaceutical supply chain and more information about drug makers who have better quality drugs would do a lot to tackle drug shortages, Dr Fox said. Many drugmakers are unlikely to invest in quality because there is so little transparency in the manufacture of prescription drugs, she said.

“If we had that transparency, people might care a little bit more about it,” Dr. Fox said. “We know a lot more about where our food comes from than where our medicine comes from. Drugs are one of the only things we buy where we have very little information about who made them, where they were made, and the reputation of those who made them. this.”

What can hospital pharmacy managers do to address drug shortages?

Addressing the root causes of drug shortages is complex, as there are many players in the pharmaceutical supply chain.

“Part of our challenge is that we are downstream of most solutions because you have your manufacturer, your [group purchasing organization], your wholesaler. So we are at the mercy of many players in this space, ”said Dr Tryon. “I think it would be best if we worked to ensure a constant supply of raw materials, make sure we have more visibility into the supply chain and make sure there is no purchase of panic. Much of the change has to come from the top down. “

One thing pharmacy executives can focus on is developing a method to detect drug shortages as early as possible. At Wake Forest Baptist Health, the pharmacy team has developed dashboards to manage their inventory so they know where their drugs are in the system at all times, Dr Tryon said. A dashboard is specific to shortages to help the team monitor them.

The healthcare system also has a committee made up of pharmacy leaders from across the organization that meets weekly to review the management of emerging drug shortages.

“At any given time, we are actively managing over 100 drug shortages. It’s pretty typical, ”Dr Tryon said.

Dr. Fox added that she believes every hospital should at least have a framework in place for how they would allocate shortage drugs so that the pharmacy team doesn’t have to make this decision alone. Just as providers had to make decisions during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic about who to choose for care, hospitals should have protocols in place to determine who is treated with a drug in case of illness. shortage.

“If you have 10 doses of something left and you need 30 people, who gets it?” Dr. Fox asked.

Many of the changes that should be made to prevent drug shortages are the responsibility of manufacturers and regulators, but hospital pharmacy executives can take a proactive approach to detect shortages early and have plans in place to allocate drugs when they are needed. they are in short supply, Dr Fox and Dr Tryon agreed.


Source link

]]>
Withybush Hospital Pharmacy Raises Money for Maggie’s https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/withybush-hospital-pharmacy-raises-money-for-maggies/ Fri, 21 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/withybush-hospital-pharmacy-raises-money-for-maggies/ The WITHYBUSH Department of Pharmacy exceeded its goal by raising funds for the cancer charity Maggies. The Whitybush Hospital Pharmacy Department took up Maggies’ challenge to “take a dip a day in May” in an open water area to raise money for Maggie’s Swansea. The original target set by Maggies was £ 150 for everyone […]]]>

The WITHYBUSH Department of Pharmacy exceeded its goal by raising funds for the cancer charity Maggies.

The Whitybush Hospital Pharmacy Department took up Maggies’ challenge to “take a dip a day in May” in an open water area to raise money for Maggie’s Swansea.

The original target set by Maggies was £ 150 for everyone who took on the challenge.

Withybush’s pharmacy department absolutely bulldozed that figure and raised over £ 500.

Joanna Rees is one of 20 participants to dip her toes in the cold waters off the Pembrokeshire coast, all with the help of charity.

Joanna said, “As part of their ‘May Day Dip’, the pharmacy department at Withybush Hospital is currently swimming in the sea every day to raise money for Maggies Cancer Charity.

“As a team, we swam in the sea every day in the hopes of raising as much money as possible for the Maggies Cancer Charity.

“We try to raise as much awareness as possible.”

A spokesperson for Maggie’s charity said: “We ask swimmers to simply swim in the sea / river / open water of their choice, for as long as desired, once a day until ‘to May 31.

“We are asking you to commit to a fundraising goal of £ 150 to help us continue to support local people affected by cancer, their families and friends. Once the fundraising goal is reached, we will send a Maggie Medal. ”

If you would like to donate, go to the pharmacy’s Just Giving page.


Source link

]]>
Hospital pharmacy could move to High Street https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/hospital-pharmacy-could-move-to-high-street/ Mon, 12 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/hospital-pharmacy-could-move-to-high-street/ Kamsons Health & Beauty in Uckfield High Street which could become a pharmacy again. Kamsons Pharmacy is considering moving its pharmacy from Uckfield Community Hospital to High Street. Professional development director Mark Donaghy says the pharmacy has become very quiet, especially since the pandemic, as many patients have remote consultations rather than going to the […]]]>

Kamsons Health & Beauty in Uckfield High Street which could become a pharmacy again.

Kamsons Pharmacy is considering moving its pharmacy from Uckfield Community Hospital to High Street.

Professional development director Mark Donaghy says the pharmacy has become very quiet, especially since the pandemic, as many patients have remote consultations rather than going to the hospital or Bird in Eye eye surgery.

And more and more patients are now having drugs delivered through Kamsons’ free delivery service, picking them up from the Kamsons Pharmacy in Bell Farm Road, or using other pharmacies to avoid going to hospital during the pandemic. .

Very small

Also, says Mark, the hospital pharmacy is very small and no longer has the use of a private consultation room that is expected of community pharmacies.

Kamsons still has its health and beauty store in Uckfield High Street, which was once a drugstore. It is large and has the space to provide a private consultation room.

Mark says, “Many of our pharmacies offer a range of services such as pharmacist prescribing, travel, shingles, influenza and Covid, vaccinations or INR tests and dose adjustments for patients taking warfarin.

Views

“The small size of the hospital pharmacy hinders the provision and commissioning of such services. “

The views of patients entering the hospital pharmacy are currently being researched on how they would feel if the pharmacy moved to the High Street.

• Kamsons Health & Beauty in Uckfield High Street was once a drugstore, but closed and changed its name in 2019.

Move

Indeed, when Meads Surgery moved its premises to Bell Farm Road and a Kamsons pharmacy opened there, NHS England did not award a new NHS pharmacy contract to allow the High Street one to continue. .

Kamsons instead ran a non-NHS pharmacy on the High Street, but government cuts to pharmacy funding meant it was no longer viable to continue in this fashion.

Duchess

• The Duchess of Cornwall visited the head office of Kamsons Pharmacy on the Bellbrook Estate last month.

Staff from local branches were introduced to the Duchess and she was introduced to company owners and some head office and warehouse staff.

Read more and see photos here: The Duchess of Cornwall visits Uckfield.

See also:

Uckfield Covid-19 infections as low as last August

County Council Election Candidates for Uckfield and Beyond

Sussex Support Service is recruiting

Find local businesses in our Uckfield directory

How to Advertise on UckfieldNews.com


Source link

]]>
Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital Pharmacy Team – Trail Daily Times https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/kootenay-boundary-regional-hospital-pharmacy-team-trail-daily-times/ Tue, 30 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/kootenay-boundary-regional-hospital-pharmacy-team-trail-daily-times/ As a student in the UBC pharmacy program over 20 years ago, Michael Conci worked at Vancouver General Hospital as a pharmacy technician student. It was his first experience working in a healthcare facility and it struck a chord, igniting a passion for working in a hospital setting. Growing up in Rossland and a lover […]]]>

As a student in the UBC pharmacy program over 20 years ago, Michael Conci worked at Vancouver General Hospital as a pharmacy technician student. It was his first experience working in a healthcare facility and it struck a chord, igniting a passion for working in a hospital setting.

Growing up in Rossland and a lover of the outdoors, Michael knew he wanted to return to the Kootenays after graduation. Luckily, Trail Hospital was hiring when he graduated and he joined the pharmacy team at Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital (KBRH) in 2001.

“I had gotten the job of my dreams in a field where I loved to grow up and where I eventually wanted to start a family,” says Michael, recalling a long career that has developed with his family and the pharmacy that has become like a second home. “Trail is now the home of my wife Amy (RN at KBRH), our three daughters and our chocolate lab. “

With all that is developing in his life, it is fitting that KBRH Pharmacy also grows to meet the needs of a department whose staff has doubled since Michael joined. The pharmacy expansion and renovation is part of KBRH’s ongoing redevelopment with an investment of $ 57.8 million in two different capital projects.

A new emergency department opened at KBRH last fall, and construction of a new outpatient unit and refurbishment of the pharmacy is underway. The current project also includes improvements to KBRH’s oncology unit, plaster clinic, physiotherapy department and medical records area.

Michael Conci, KBRH pharmacist, with pharmacy technicians Desiree Borsato (left) and Carrie St. Onge. Photo: Submitted

In the pharmacy, the footprint will increase dramatically, leaving more space for the talented team of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians to work and ensure that “the right medicine gets to the right patient at the right time,” a mantra. experienced by the KBRH pharmacy team. .

The increased space means quieter places for the pharmacy team. Other pharmacy upgrades include a new private area for patient counseling, standard intravenous preparation rooms, and secure storage rooms.

The pharmacy team may not be seen by patients, but they will be working in a modern setting with cutting edge technology to help support patient care. Pharmacists help develop a drug treatment plan for patients before pharmacy technicians make a distribution plan so nurses can administer the correct medication. This is a complex process where the safe distribution of medications is the top priority.

The hospital pharmacy also distributes medication to outpatients in the community, including all oncology patients. Providing patients with medicines allows them to pick up at home and those who come to pick up medicines will be able to do so and talk to their pharmacist in a new private consultation space, once the project is over.

For Michael Conci, the improved pharmacy will help support the great work that is already happening every day, supporting people’s health.

“I look forward to having a space that helps our team do their jobs safely and efficiently,” he says. “Patients don’t often see the pharmacy team working hard to achieve our vision of ‘taking care of every patient through proper, timely and safe medication management’.

The project will end in 2023.

Pharmacy facts:

• March is Pharmacy Appreciation Month, and the Canadian Pharmacists Association celebrates the work of 42,500 pharmacists across Canada. Take a few minutes to find out more about what your pharmacist can do for you at rethinkpharmacists.ca.

• With KBRH, Interior Health has pharmacy renovation projects underway in hospital pharmacies at East Kootenay Regional Hospital in Cranbrook, Kootenay Lake Hospital in Nelson, Shuswap Lake General Hospital in Salmon Arm, Royal Inland in Kamloops and the Penticton Regional Hospital.


press room@trailtimes.ca
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

BC HealthKootenay Boundary Regional District



Source link

]]>
Labor has no plans to nationalize hospital pharmacy, says shadow pharmacy minister https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/labor-has-no-plans-to-nationalize-hospital-pharmacy-says-shadow-pharmacy-minister/ Thu, 25 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://partnerpharmacy24-7.com/labor-has-no-plans-to-nationalize-hospital-pharmacy-says-shadow-pharmacy-minister/ Labor Party proposals to nationalize hospital pharmacy services have been taken off the table, the shadow minister of health responsible for pharmacy said. It comes after former Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell told LBC Radio in November 2019 that the Labor Party intended to move the provision of pharmacy services “in-house”. Pharmaceutical journal later clarified that […]]]>

Labor Party proposals to nationalize hospital pharmacy services have been taken off the table, the shadow minister of health responsible for pharmacy said.

It comes after former Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell told LBC Radio in November 2019 that the Labor Party intended to move the provision of pharmacy services “in-house”.

Pharmaceutical journal later clarified that the plans were to return hospital pharmacies run by private companies to NHS property.

However, shadow minister of pharmacy Alex Norris said Pharmaceutical journal on March 24, 2021 that it was “not in the current plans”.

“The key for us now is to respond to the NHS white paper on terms set by the government, so that is our goal,” he said.

Talk to Pharmaceutical journal Following a parliamentary debate on community pharmacy funding on March 11, 2021, Norris said the current model community pharmacy contract in England was “funded by other elements, [and] it is not sustainable.

He said a revised funding model under a Labor government would look at “the whole range of operations in a pharmacy”.

“What are the things that we don’t want people to do in walk-in centers or A&E that could be done on Main Street? He explained. “That’s what pharmacists tell us they want to do, but it needs to be reflected in the contract rather than just goodwill. “

“So rather than adopting – as we have done in this country for the last decade – a ‘sweat assets’ approach to public services, we need to have an investment approach,” he said. he declares.

He added that the reduction in dispensing fees was “a sign of the government’s wrong approach” to community pharmacy.

“It’s one aspect – a very important aspect of the nature of community pharmacy – but looking at this one thing … in isolation, I think that’s a mistake.”

As part of the community pharmacy contractual framework for 2019/2020 to 2023/2024, the government has said it plans to reduce dispensing fees by an amount yet to be agreed upon on the five-year settlement.

Norris added that the lack of government funding for COVID-19 pharmacy costs shows “a failure of leadership.”

Although the Prime Minister has pledged additional funding for the community pharmacy, Norris said, “That doesn’t mean it’s going to happen. “

Government response to pharmacy closures “explains failure”, says Norris

Alex Norris said Pharmaceutical journal that he was “worried about the prospects” for community pharmacies.

“I think the Department [of Health and Social Care] believes that there are too many community pharmacies and, therefore, [the prime minister is] let the market deal with it, ”he said.

A survey of Pharmaceutical journal in January 2021 revealed that the number of closures increased during the pandemic, with a net total of 202 pharmacies closed in 2020, up from 123 net closings in 2019, 122 in 2018 and just 25 in 2017.

Deprived areas turned out to be the hardest hit, with 81 of those closures occurring in the 20% of the most deprived areas, while 19 were closed in the 20% of the richest areas in 2020.

Norris said Pharmacy Minister Jo Churchill’s response to the parliamentary debate on March 11, 2021 – that there are more closures “where they’re clustered” – “explains the failure”.

“The problem with the current department’s analysis is that they come across as passive observers,” he said.

“But at the end of the day, they have a contractual relationship with the pharmacies, and if their partners go bankrupt and they are the main source of funding, that poses a very deep question.”

READ MORE: PJ Point of View: Pharmacies Shouldn’t Have to Beg for COVID-19 Expenses


Source link

]]>